Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:984] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Dr Robert Wood / Regarding: Mr John Donaldson (Patient) / 1 July 1780 / (Outgoing)

Reply 'For Mr Donaldson'. Cullen 'cannot form a favourable prognostic', but does believe that the present circumstances at least are favourable.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 984
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/13/39
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date1 July 1780
Annotation None
TypeScribal copy ( includes Casebook Entry)
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe Yes
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply 'For Mr Donaldson'. Cullen 'cannot form a favourable prognostic', but does believe that the present circumstances at least are favourable.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1248]
Case of Mr John Donaldson, a 'gentleman farmer' seized with a Palsy.
2


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:101]AddresseeDr Robert Wood
[PERS ID:786]PatientMr John Donaldson
[PERS ID:101]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Robert Wood
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Perth Mid Scotland Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
For Mr Donaldson


I cannot form a favourable prognostic. The present circum¬
stances however are favourable & I hope they will go on.
Nothing is more promising than the recovery of his speech and
senses. The measures you have pursued as judicious so have
they been successful & I think you have great encouragement
to repeat them but before you engage in a new round of
blisters I would advise another bleeding unless you find
circumstances to contra indicate. His bowels are as usual
in such cases, torpid & require a frequent stimulus and I
think there is nothing more necessary than to keep his head
pretty constantly relieved by an open belly. The Tartar E¬
metic
is very proper but the repetition of vomiting is unne¬
cessary & may fatigue. Your Laxative is proper and therefore
you may sometime employ the Laxative ordered below. In
case of any loss of sense or motion coming upon one of
the limbs while a blister is applied to the other you may
try a plaister of table mustard applied for an hour or two
to the part affected. If this disease persist without re¬
covering you may think of Electricity to the arm orleg
but without going to the head. I hope however you need be
in no haste with this. In the mean time I hope he may
be better for the Cephalic ordered below.

Take an ounce of Crystal Tartar, two drachms of powdered compound of Jalap, and half an ounce of Lenitive Electuary 1 with sufficient quantity of simple Syrup to make into a soft Electuary or Lochoch [Linctus]. Label: Laxative Electuary. Two teaspoonfuls in the morning for a dose.

Take an an ounce each of powdered Peruvian Bark --- and Root of Wild Valerian; A drachm of Mustard Seed, an ounce of conserve of orange peel. [Sy?] Simple Syrup, sufficent to make into an Electuary S. Cephalic Electuary, the bigness of a nutmeg twice a day.

W.C.
Edinburgh 1. July 1780 ----

Notes:

1: A 'lenitive' medicine tends 'to allay or soften; mitigating, soothing; gently laxative' OED.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
For Mr Donaldson


I cannot form a favourable prognostic. The present circum¬
stances however are favourable & I hope they will go on.
Nothing is more promising than the recovery of his speech and
senses. The measures you have pursued as judicious so have
they been successful & I think you have great encouragement
to repeat them but before you engage in a new round of
blisters I would advise another bleeding unless you find
circumstances to contra indicate. His bowels are as usual
in such cases, torpid & require a frequent stimulus and I
think there is nothing more necessary than to keep his head
pretty constantly relieved by an open belly. The Tartar E¬
metic
is very proper but the repetition of vomiting is unne¬
cessary & may fatigue. Your Laxative is proper and therefore
you may sometime employ the Laxative ordd. below. In
case of any loss of sense or motion coming upon one of
the limbs while a blister is applied to the other you may
try a plaister of table mustard applied for an hour or two
to the part affected. If this disease persist without re¬
covering you may think of Electricity to the arm orleg
but without going to the head. I hope however you need be
in no haste with this. In the mean time I hope he may
be better for the Cephalic ordd. below.


Cryst, tart. ℥i Pulv. e jal. comp. ʒij. Elect. lenit ℥ſs
Syr. simpl. q.s. ut s. Elect. Ten. s. Lochoch.
S. Laxat. Elect. two tea spoonfuls in the morning for a dose.


℞ Pulv. cort. Peruvc --- rad. valerian. silvestr. @℥i
Semin. sinap ʒij Conserv. e cort. aurant. ℥i [Sy?]
Syr. simpl. q.s. ut f. Elect.
S. Cephalic Electuary, the bigness of a nutmeg twice a day.

W.C.
Edbr. 1. July 1780 ----

Notes:

1: A 'lenitive' medicine tends 'to allay or soften; mitigating, soothing; gently laxative' OED.

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