Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:906] From: Dr Charles Blagden / To: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / Regarding: Mr Tillard (Patient) / 29 July 1774 / (Incoming)

Letter from C. Blagden concerning the case of Mr Tillard, 'a Gentleman that lately applied to me on account of a disease, in most respects like that which you so accurately & pathetically discribed under the name of Dyspepsia'. Blagden has recommended travel to the Highlands, but warns that 'it is necessary [...] to make his access to women as difficult as possible, for he does not abound in resolution'.

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 906
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/2/170
Main Language English
Document Direction Incoming
Date29 July 1774
Annotation None
TypeAuthorial original
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter from C. Blagden concerning the case of Mr Tillard, 'a Gentleman that lately applied to me on account of a disease, in most respects like that which you so accurately & pathetically discribed under the name of Dyspepsia'. Blagden has recommended travel to the Highlands, but warns that 'it is necessary [...] to make his access to women as difficult as possible, for he does not abound in resolution'.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:448]
Case of Mr Tillard who reports that he has 'dyspepsia'.
1


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:421]AuthorDr Charles Blagden
[PERS ID:1]AddresseeDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:422]PatientMr Tillard
[PERS ID:421]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Charles Blagden
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1340]Patient's Relative / Spouse / Friend Tillard

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Gray's Inn London London and South-East England Europe certain
Destination of Letter Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe inferred
Therapeutic Recommendation Blair Atholl Mid Scotland Scotland Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Highlands East Highlands Scotland Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Invercauld East Highlands Scotland Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Loch Ness North Highlands Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]


M.r Tillard, who brings you this
letter, is a Gentleman that lately applied to me on
account of a disease, in most respects like that which
you so accurately & pathetically defined under the
name of Dyspepsia, when I had the Honour of
attending your Lectures. He brought it on himself,
as is commonly the case, by Debauchery of every
kind from his earliest youth, increased by the use of
the strongest stimulants both in diet & medicine.
I adivsed him ↑as he had already taken vast loads of Drugs↑ to depend on Regimen chiefly for his
cure; & to begin with making a Sea voyage, & then
going into the Highlands of Scotland, to drink
Goats whey, & be strengthened by the invigorating
air of that country. As he always shews great
sensibility to moisture, I apprehended that the most
interior parts of the Highlands, at a distance from
the Western coast, would suit him best, perhaps



[Page 2]

about the head of the Dee, near Invercauld; or somewhere
between Blair in Athol, & Loch Ness; however,
as I do not know whether any tolerable accomo¬
dations can be procured in those parts, & particu¬
larly whether he would be likely to find any
person to converse with, without which I fear
his Spirits would sink too low, the determina¬
tion of the place must rest intirely with you.
At the time of my writing this, his chief Symptoms
are; Chilliness with occasional thrills, like the running
of cold water, along his sides, a strong feeling of oppression
&, at times very low spirits; clammy sweats; a very
large secretion of mucus in the stomach & intestines,
& a very craving appetite; impotency, attended with
an almost total want of feeling in the Glans Penis
& want of all secretion in the sebaceous glands of
the corona; indeed these parts seem to have been
originally less sensible than is common, for notwith¬
standing the most indiscriminate connexions with


[Page 3]

all the foulest of women, he never found any symptom of the
venereal disease. Perhaps, by the time of his getting to
you, his complaints may have changed in many
respects, so as to point out a different mode of
proceeding for his cure, which you will be so kind
as to direct. All the other particulars of what he
did formerly, what he has done by my advice, & the
general method which I wished him to pursue, you
will have best from his own mouth, ↑& advise him accordingly.↑ I will only
mention one caution: He is extremely fond, not
merely out of lasciviousness, but very much with a
view of trying whether his powers begin to revive,
of playing with women; the consequence is, that
he frequently gets a partial erection, which
is followed by a considerable discharge of glairy
matter from the urethra, to his great prejudice;
it is necessary to warn him perpetually against this,
& also to make his access to women as difficult as
possible, for he does not abound in resolution.


I am, Sir,
your most obedient humble Servant
Gray's Inn, July 29, 1774.



[Page 4]


P.S. M.r Tillard's Father died of
nearly the same disease.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]


M.r Tillard, who brings you this
letter, is a Gentleman that lately applied to me on
account of a disease, in most respects like that which
you so accurately & pathetically defined under the
name of Dyspepsia, when I had the Honour of
attending your Lectures. He brought it on himself,
as is commonly the case, by Debauchery of every
kind from his earliest youth, increased by the use of
the strongest stimulants both in diet & medicine.
I adivsed him ↑as he had already taken vast loads of Drugs↑ to depend on Regimen chiefly for his
cure; & to begin with making a Sea voyage, & then
going into the Highlands of Scotland, to drink
Goats whey, & be strengthened by the invigorating
air of that country. As he always shews great
sensibility to moisture, I apprehended that the most
interior parts of the Highlands, at a distance from
the Western coast, would suit him best, perhaps



[Page 2]

about the head of the Dee, near Invercauld; or somewhere
between Blair in Athol, & Loch Ness; however,
as I do not know whether any tolerable accomo¬
dations can be procured in those parts, & particu¬
larly whether he would be likely to find any
person to converse with, without which I fear
his Spirits would sink too low, the determina¬
tion of the place must rest intirely with you.
At the time of my writing this, his chief Symptoms
are; Chilliness with occasional thrills, like the running
of cold water, along his sides, a strong feeling of oppression
&, at times very low spirits; clammy sweats; a very
large secretion of mucus in the stomach & intestines,
& a very craving appetite; impotency, attended with
an almost total want of feeling in the Glans Penis
& want of all secretion in the sebaceous glands of
the corona; indeed these parts seem to have been
originally less sensible than is common, for notwith¬
standing the most indiscriminate connexions with


[Page 3]

all the foulest of women, he never found any symptom of the
venereal disease. Perhaps, by the time of his getting to
you, his complaints may have changed in many
respects, so as to point out a different mode of
proceeding for his cure, which you will be so kind
as to direct. All the other particulars of what he
did formerly, what he has done by my advice, & the
general method which I wished him to pursue, you
will have best from his own mouth, ↑& advise him accordingly.↑ I will only
mention one caution: He is extremely fond, not
merely out of lasciviousness, but very much with a
view of trying whether his powers begin to revive,
of playing with women; the consequence is, that
he frequently gets a partial erection, which
is followed by a considerable discharge of glairy
matter from the urethra, to his great prejudice;
it is necessary to warn him perpetually against this,
& also to make his access to women as difficult as
possible, for he does not abound in resolution.


I am, Sir,
your most obed.t hble Serv.t
Gray's Inn, July 29, 1774.



[Page 4]


P.S. M.r Tillard's Father died of
nearly the same disease.

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