Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:655] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Mrs Lucy Maxwell (Gage) (of Munchies, Munches) / Regarding: Mrs Lucy Maxwell (Gage) (of Munchies, Munches) (Patient), Mr George Maxwell (of Munchies, Munches) (Patient) / 20 October 1782 / (Outgoing)

Reply, 'Mrs Maxwell of Munshes'; Cullen believes that 'with originally weak nerves and delicacy of body, you have had some heat arise in your blood and have some infirmity in the region of the womb'. Also includes a recipe for Mr Maxwell of Munshes.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 655
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/15/141
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date20 October 1782
Annotation None
TypeMachine copy
Enclosure(s) Enclosure(s) present
Autopsy No
Recipe Yes
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply, 'Mrs Maxwell of Munshes'; Cullen believes that 'with originally weak nerves and delicacy of body, you have had some heat arise in your blood and have some infirmity in the region of the womb'. Also includes a recipe for Mr Maxwell of Munshes.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:780]
Case of Mrs Maxwell of Munches [Munchies] whose symptoms are attributed to 'a weakness of the womb'; she is later considered a 'nervous' case. Cullen's replies refer to a number of incoming letters which are untraced.
9
[Case ID:2049]
Case of Mr Maxwell of Muches [Munchies], who is prescribed a linseed injection (enema).
2


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:2415]AddresseeMrs Lucy Maxwell (of Munchies, Munches)
[PERS ID:3082]PatientMr George Maxwell (of Munchies, Munches)
[PERS ID:2415]PatientMrs Lucy Maxwell (of Munchies, Munches)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Kirkcudbright Borders Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Mrs Maxwell of Munshes
Madam


I have the honour of yours of the 17th and
shall be exceeding happy to have it my power to contribute
to your relief and shall certainly endeavour it as well as I can.


It appears to me that with originally weak Nerves and
delicacy of body, you have had some heat arise in your blood
and have some infirmity in the region of the womb. These
have occasioned a great variety of symptoms and I suspect
that the whole has been aggravated by your having too little
air and exercise. The opportunity of mending your manner
in these respects is now very much past but even in winter
we have very often mild weather and a close carriage may still
allow you to take some exercise which I am perswaded would
do you much service and when we got summer back again I
shall earnestly advise you to depend upon it and particularly to
take a journey. For the winter I think your dependence must
be on cold bathing. You tried a little of sea bathing in summer and
if it had disagreed with you I think you would have told me so. But
whether the sea bathing agreed with you or not I am perswaded what




[Page 2]


I am advise will be safe and usefull. It is the use of the shower
bath
which can be tempered to what degree you please, & can be em¬
ployed in all weathers because if you please it can be used without
any inconveniency in your own bedchamber. You must begin with
a water that consists of one part of boiling water & four parts of
cold water taken from a spring or pitwell never from a brook or
river. After using this for some days you may keep out a
small portion of the boiling water and by degrees either keep
it out the whole or a part of it only as you shall find you
bear it. If by this means you can be reconciled to this practice
I am certain of your being better for it. If you cannot be pro¬
vided with a proper machine in the country let me know and
I shall have a very fit one sent to you from this town.


Beside the remedies of exercise and cold bathing I am dis¬
posed to advise few others and particularly few medicines but I
shall advise one which I think may cool your blood and be
of service in obviating costiveness. It is prescribed on the paper
inclosed. You are to take a table spoonfull of it mixed with
half a pint of a little more of fresh drawn Cow milk whey in the
morning either before you rise or immediately after you are up.




[Page 3]


You need not take this medicine every day and two or three times a
week only but oftener or seldomer as as costiveness may seem to require.
I intend that it should give one easy motion only and if it does either
more or less the dose is to be diminished or increased.


It is a little difficult to be positive in ordering your diet and
I must leave a great deal to your own experience. My opinion is
that much or heavy animal food would do much harm but that
a diet entirely of vegetables would be as bad. Please therefore to
mix them as your own feelings shall direct. In drinking abstain
from all malt liquors. Let your ordinary be water with
a little red port in it, and if you don't find it heating
I think a glass or perhaps two or plain wine of white or
red as you like best may be of service. I am concerned for your
being obliged to lay aside your flannels and I would advise your
wearing cotton perhaps two fold next your skin. If I have not
touched every point or answered every question you would desire please
let me know and I shall endeavour to supply the defects being
most respectfully

Madam Your most obedient humble servant
William Cullen

Edinburgh 20th. October
1782


On the inclosed paper I have given a prescription
for Mr Maxwell to whom please presenting respectfull Compliments.




[Page 4]
For Mrs Maxwell of Munshes.

Take two ounces of soluble Tartar, two drachms each of polychest Salts and Spanish Sea-Salt, three ounces of pure Cinnamon water and five ounces of Rose water. Dissolve and strain. Label: Cooling Solution.

20th October 1782.
W. C.
For Mr Maxwell of Munshes

Take half an ounce of Unguentum Saturninum and Wax Liniment. Mix carefully. Label: Cooling Liniment a little to be anointed on the part well dried, every night & morning.

W. C.
20th October 1782.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Mrs Maxwell of Munshes
Madam


I have the honour of yours of the 17th and
shall be exceeding happy to have it my power to contribute
to your relief and shall certainly endeavour it as well as I can.


It appears to me that with originally weak Nerves and
delicacy of body, you have had some heat arise in your blood
and have some infirmity in the region of the womb. These
have occasioned a great variety of symptoms and I suspect
that the whole has been aggravated by your having too little
air and exercise. The opportunity of mending your manner
in these respects is now very much past but even in winter
we have very often mild weather and a close carriage may still
allow you to take some exercise which I am perswaded would
do you much service and when we got summer back again I
shall earnestly advise you to depend upon it and particularly to
take a journey. For the winter I think your dependence must
be on cold bathing. You tried a little of sea bathing in summer and
if it had disagreed with you I think you would have told me so. But
whether the sea bathing agreed with you or not I am perswaded what




[Page 2]


I am advise will be safe and usefull. It is the use of the shower
bath
which can be tempered to what degree you please, & can be em¬
ployed in all weathers because if you please it can be used without
any inconveniency in your own bedchamber. You must begin wth
a water that consists of one part of boiling water & four parts of
cold water taken from a spring or pitwell never from a brook or
river. After using this for some days you may keep out a
small portion of the boiling water and by degrees either keep
it out the whole or a part of it only as you shall find you
bear it. If by this means you can be reconciled to this practice
I am certain of your being better for it. If you cannot be pro¬
vided with a proper machine in the country let me know and
I shall have a very fit one sent to you from this town.


Beside the remedies of exercise and cold bathing I am dis¬
posed to advise few others and particularly few medicines but I
shall advise one which I think may cool your blood and be
of service in obviating costiveness. It is prescribed on the paper
inclosed. You are to take a table spoonfull of it mixed with
half a pint of a little more of fresh drawn Cow milk whey in the
morning either before you rise or immediately after you are up.




[Page 3]


You need not take this medicine every day and two or three times a
week only but oftener or seldomer as as costiveness may seem to require.
I intend that it should give one easy motion only and if it does either
more or less the dose is to be diminished or increased.


It is a little difficult to be positive in ordering your diet and
I must leave a great deal to your own experience. My opinion is
that much or heavy animal food would do much harm but that
a diet entirely of vegetables would be as bad. Please therefore to
mix them as your own feelings shall direct. In drinking abstain
from all malt liquors. Let your ordinary be water with
a little red port in it, and if you don't find it heating
I think a glass or perhaps two or plain wine of white or
red as you like best may be of service. I am concerned for your
being obliged to lay aside your flannels and I would advise your
wearing cotton perhaps two fold next your skin. If I have not
touched every point or answered every question you would desire please
let me know and I shall endeavour to supply the defects being
most respectfully

Madam Your most obedt. humble servant
William Cullen

Edinr. 20th. Octor.
1782


On the inclosed paper I have given a prescription
for Mr Maxwell to whom please presenting respectfull Compliments.




[Page 4]
For Mrs Maxwell of Munshes.
20th Octor. 1782.
W. C.
For Mr Maxwell of Munshes


Ung. Saturninin.
Liniment. cerei @ ℥ſs
ℳ accurate
Sig. Cooling Liniment a little to be
anointed on the part well dried, every
night & morning

W. C.
20th Octor. 1782.

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