Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:5540] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Dr / Regarding: Mr Alexander Dirom (of Muiresk) (Patient) / 1 October 1787 / (Outgoing)

Letter for 'Mr Fotheringham's friend' (identified in the index as Mr Dirom), Mr Fotheringham (one of the patient's in-laws) having communicated the case to him. Cullen considers that "Golf is a very wholesome exercise" for the patient.

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

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[Page 2]


 

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 5540
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/20/160
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date1 October 1787
Annotation None
TypeScribal copy ( includes Casebook Entry)
Enclosure(s) Enclosure(s) present
Autopsy No
Recipe Yes
Regimen Yes
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter for 'Mr Fotheringham's friend' (identified in the index as Mr Dirom), Mr Fotheringham (one of the patient's in-laws) having communicated the case to him. Cullen considers that "Golf is a very wholesome exercise" for the patient.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:787]
Case of Alexander Dirom, who has a urinary tract ailment.
16


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:5911]AddresseeDr
[PERS ID:5422]PatientMr Alexander Dirom (of Muiresk)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:5911]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr
[PERS ID:5425]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendMr Fotheringham (Fothringham)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Mr. Fotheringhams friend


I have considered the case communicated to me
by Mr. Fotheringham with the utmost attention. I
have no difficulty in judging of the nature of the case
but I am sorry to observe that it may be of difficult
cure. It is a constitutional ailment that has subsisted
for the whole of his life, and must therefore now
be difficult to mend. It is however a local ailment
that does not affect his general health, and I hope
it may be prevented from ever doing so.


This regimen of late has been very properly
ordered, but he must consider himself as particularly
delicate with respect to exercise, and that on this
head he must always be extremely cautious. His
walking ought always to be very gentle, never fast
never up hill, nor never long at one time. He
may go on horseback, if he goes at a foots pace
but trotting will always be hazardous. Going in
a Carriage at a slow pace or smooth road maybe



[Page 2]

safer, but hardly sufficient Exercise.


His diet seems to be properly ordered, but I must
observe that he should be very moderate with respect
to Animal food even at dinner, and ↑he↑ ought to take
none at all at Supper. Broth Pudding and
Vegetables ought always to make a great part
of his dinner, and he ought steadily to persist in
avoiding every thing salted, or seasoned with any
kind of Spicery. I have no objection to Spruce beer
taken moderately, but water is still better.
The wine he takes is very allowable, especially
as it is diluted with water.


He has been very properly advised to the
Uva Ursi, but if he has taken it for any length
of time, he should lay it aside for a fortnight, and
then enter upon it again at two tea spoonfuls
for a dose, but never continue it for more than
a fortnight at one time ––


Gum water may be a very proper remedy
but I don't know of what {illeg} to {illeg}



[Page 3]

it, and therefore on the inclosed paper I have
given a prescription for the manner in which
I think it may be best employed. With the
continuance of these medicines I have only one
other for the present to advise, and I have pre¬
scribed it on the inclosed paper and am hopeful
it may be very useful. I have no more to say
but what I forgot to say above that Golf is a very
wholesome exercise, but in this case it should
be used more gently than most Golfers will
admit of.

William Cullen



[Page 4]
For Mr. Fotheringhams friend

Take one drachm of Powdered gum Arabic half a drachm of White Sugar three grains of Alum rock Mix to make enough powders for twelve doses Label: Emollient powders One to be taken in a gill and half of Spring water every night and morning

Take three ounces of Rosewater, and a half ounce each of Syrup of Dried Roses and thin Vitriolic Spirit Mix. Label: Cooling mixture a Tea spoonful to be taken in an ordinary wine glassful of water twice a day immediately after taking his powders


1st. October
1787
W.C.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Mr. Fotheringhams friend


I have considered the case communicated to me
by Mr. Fotheringham with the utmost attention. I
have no difficulty in judging of the nature of the case
but I am sorry to observe that it may be of difficult
cure. It is a constitutional ailment that has subsisted
for the whole of his life, and must therefore now
be difficult to mend. It is however a local ailment
that does not affect his general health, and I hope
it may be prevented from ever doing so.


This regimen of late has been very properly
ordered, but he must consider himself as particularly
delicate with respect to exercise, and that on this
head he must always be extremely cautious. His
walking ought always to be very gentle, never fast
never up hill, nor never long at one time. He
may go on horseback, if he goes at a foots pace
but trotting will always be hazardous. Going in
a Carriage at a slow pace or smooth road maybe



[Page 2]

safer, but hardly sufficient Exercise.


His diet seems to be properly ordered, but I must
observe that he should be very moderate with respect
to Animal food even at dinner, and ↑he↑ ought to take
none at all at Supper. Broth Pudding and
Vegetables ought always to make a great part
of his dinner, and he ought steadily to persist in
avoiding every thing salted, or seasoned with any
kind of Spicery. I have no objection to Spruce beer
taken moderately, but water is still better.
The wine he takes is very allowable, especially
as it is diluted with water.


He has been very properly advised to the
Uva Ursi, but if he has taken it for any length
of time, he should lay it aside for a fortnight, and
then enter upon it again at two tea spoonfuls
for a dose, but never continue it for more than
a fortnight at one time ––


Gum water may be a very proper remedy
but I don't know of what {illeg} to {illeg}



[Page 3]

it, and therefore on the inclosed paper I have
given a prescription for the manner in which
I think it may be best employed. With the
continuance of these medicines I have only one
other for the present to advise, and I have pre¬
scribed it on the inclosed paper and am hopeful
it may be very useful. I have no more to say
but what I forgot to say above that Golf is a very
wholesome exercise, but in this case it should
be used more gently than most Golfers will
admit of.

William Cullen



[Page 4]
For Mr. Fotheringhams friend


Pulv. g. Arab. ʒj
Sacchar. alb. ʒſs
Alumin. rup. gr. iij
ℳ. f. pulvis et f. h. m. dos. № xij
Sig. Emollient powders One to
be taken in a gill and half of Spring
water every night and morning


Aq. rosar. ℥iij
Syr. e ros. sicc.
Sp. vitriol. ten. @ ℥ſs
ℳ. Sig. Cooling mixture a Tea
spoonful to be taken in an
ordinary wine glassful of water
twice a day immediately after
taking his powders


1st. Octr.
1787
W.C.

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