Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:5235] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: [ADDRESSEE UNKNOWN] / Regarding: Mr Gilbert Basil Scott (Basil Scott) (Patient) / 6 April 1786 / (Outgoing)

Reply to Laurence Edmonstone headed 'For Mr Basil Scott'.

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 5235
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/19/47
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date6 April 1786
Annotation None
TypeMachine copy
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy Yes
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply to Laurence Edmonstone headed 'For Mr Basil Scott'.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1895]
Case of Basil Scott who has a long-standing lung and stomach disorder.
2


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1556]PatientMr Gilbert Basil Scott (Basil Scott)
[PERS ID:605]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr Laurence Edmonston (Edmonstone)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:605]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendMr Laurence Edmonston (Edmonstone)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Lerwick Shetlands Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]

For Mr. Basil Scott


In a person who has for so many years suffered
under Pulmunary and Stomachic complaints it is
difficult to advise with any clearness and confidence
and I cannot miss to admire the Skill and address
with which Mr. Edmonstone has ap relieved him
so often and preserved him so long. The longer how¬
ever the disease has subsisted it must be more
difficult to give the same relief, and I would hardly
venture to advise unless I could trust a great deal
to the discretion and judgement of the person who
is to execute.


The nervous weakness of the Stomach and the
inflammatory disposition of the lungs seem still
to continue and it is the relief of bath that we
are still to attempt. For the first I would certainly
try the Peruvian bark to what quantity his
Stomach will bear. I would begin with a watery
infusion, but would by degrees increase the Strength



[Page 2]

of it and that too by adding a portion of the bark in {illeg}
substance, and in this proceeding I would admit of {illeg}
restraint, but from the bark seeming to occasion
some difficulty of breathing in which event the
dose of bark must not be increased, or perhaps
must be laid aside. In all such cases, not only
flatulence but other Spasmodic affections, and a
general irritability must prevail, and the only certain
remedy for all this is Laudanum which Mr.
Edmonstone has judiciously employed. Though it does
not give Sleep, it gives an ease and tranquillity that
is as valuable, and I have only to say that it may
be safely carried a good deal further, than it seems
yet to have been. The only inconvenience that can
arise from it, is, its bringing on a costiveness which,
as formerly may bring on a troublesome looseness.
It will therefore be constantly necessary to obviate
this either by glysters or laxatives, and though there
has been some difficulty in employing of the latter
and that He is certainly not {illeg}
I think that magnesia [alba] {illeg}
{illeg}


[Page 3]

{illeg} and pretty safely, [on?] hardly ever
doing too much.


This is all I can well say with regard to the
state of his Stomach and I hope it is all that is
necessary. With regard to the state of his lungs I
have more difficulty. They have been often and
have continued so long in an inflammatory state
that it must now be difficult to mend, and I
know nothing to do it, but a Sea Voyage in good
weather which has been so judiciously employed
before with a good effect, but I am afraid that
neither the state of the Season nor of his weakness
will allow of it at present. I shall say however
that the Season is near at hand, and I have
Sent people to Sea in a very weakly state, and
with a very good effect, though they could be only
carried aboard lying upon a bed. I perceive that
Mr. Scott has been often the better for bleeding
but I doubt if his weakness at present will
admit of it, and I dare not prescribe it, and



[Page 4]

I believe [though?] I were upon the Spot I would trust m{illeg}
to Mr. Edmonstones judgement than my own, and to {illeg}
I must therefore leave it. The relief of his Cough I am
afraid can only be expected from the free use of Opia[tes]
which I have recommended above for the relief of h[is]
Stomach, but at the Same time I have no objection
to the use of any demulcents that he can take, and
his Stomach will bear. Other pectorals that may
be in the least heating I cannot admit of in his pre¬
sent state. With respect to his regimen Mr. Edmonst[ons]
plan of cooling and Antiphlogistic is certainly the
most proper. I doubt if solid Animal food however
agreeable to his Stomach can be safe for his breast
and if any Animal food can be employed it must
be of the very lightest kind, and I should propose
to confine him very entirely to milk and farinacea in
any kind of fruit that can be had. Somewhat Care
in drinking may be necessary, but every fermented
or Spirituous liquor must be given very sparingly.


William Cullen --

Edinburgh 6th. April
1786

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]

For Mr. Basil Scott


In a person who has for so many years suffered
under Pulmunary and Stomachic complaints it is
difficult to advise with any clearness and confidence
and I cannot miss to admire the Skill and address
with which Mr. Edmonstone has ap relieved him
so often and preserved him so long. The longer how¬
ever the disease has subsisted it must be more
difficult to give the same relief, and I would hardly
venture to advise unless I could trust a great deal
to the discretion and judgement of the person who
is to execute.


The nervous weakness of the Stomach and the
inflammatory disposition of the lungs seem still
to continue and it is the relief of bath that we
are still to attempt. For the first I would certainly
try the Peruvian bark to what quantity his
Stomach will bear. I would begin with a watery
infusion, but would by degrees increase the Strength



[Page 2]

of it and that too by adding a portion of the bark in {illeg}
substance, and in this proceeding I would admit of {illeg}
restraint, but from the bark seeming to occasion
some difficulty of breathing in which event the
dose of bark must not be increased, or perhaps
must be laid aside. In all such cases, not only
flatulence but other Spasmodic affections, and a
general irritability must prevail, and the only certain
remedy for all this is Laudanum which Mr.
Edmonstone has judiciously employed. Though it does
not give Sleep, it gives an ease and tranquillity that
is as valuable, and I have only to say that it may
be safely carried a good deal further, than it seems
yet to have been. The only inconvenience that can
arise from it, is, its bringing on a costiveness which,
as formerly may bring on a troublesome looseness.
It will therefore be constantly necessary to obviate
this either by glysters or laxatives, and though there
has been some difficulty in employing of the latter
and that He is certainly not {illeg}
I think that magnesia [alba] {illeg}
{illeg}


[Page 3]

{illeg} and pretty safely, [on?] hardly ever
doing too much.


This is all I can well say with regard to the
state of his Stomach and I hope it is all that is
necessary. With regard to the state of his lungs I
have more difficulty. They have been often and
have continued so long in an inflammatory state
that it must now be difficult to mend, and I
know nothing to do it, but a Sea Voyage in good
weather which has been so judiciously employed
before with a good effect, but I am afraid that
neither the state of the Season nor of his weakness
will allow of it at present. I shall say however
that the Season is near at hand, and I have
Sent people to Sea in a very weakly state, and
with a very good effect, though they could be only
carried aboard lying upon a bed. I perceive that
Mr. Scott has been often the better for bleeding
but I doubt if his weakness at present will
admit of it, and I dare not prescribe it, and



[Page 4]

I believe [though?] I were upon the Spot I would trust m{illeg}
to Mr. Edmonstones judgement than my own, and to {illeg}
I must therefore leave it. The relief of his Cough I am
afraid can only be expected from the free use of Opia[tes]
which I have recommended above for the relief of h[is]
Stomach, but at the Same time I have no objection
to the use of any demulcents that he can take, and
his Stomach will bear. Other pectorals that may
be in the least heating I cannot admit of in his pre¬
sent state. With respect to his regimen Mr. Edmonst[ons]
plan of cooling and Antiphlogistic is certainly the
most proper. I doubt if solid Animal food however
agreeable to his Stomach can be safe for his breast
and if any Animal food can be employed it must
be of the very lightest kind, and I should propose
to confine him very entirely to milk and farinacea in
any kind of fruit that can be had. Somewhat Care
in drinking may be necessary, but every fermented
or Spirituous liquor must be given very sparingly.


William Cullen --

Edinr. 6th. April
1786

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