Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:5095] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Mr James Monteath (Monteith) / Regarding: Mr William Bogle (Patient) / 5? July 1785 / (Outgoing)

Reply, 'Mr Bogle'. Also mentions Mr Dunlop.

Facsimile

There are 3 images for this document.

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[Page 2]


 

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 5095
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/18/78
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date5? July 1785
Annotation None
TypeMachine scribal copy
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply, 'Mr Bogle'. Also mentions Mr Dunlop.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1808]
Case of William Bogle who has lived a life of 'excess' and currently has a Pox (venereal infection).
4


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:3439]AddresseeMr James Monteath (Monteith)
[PERS ID:3440]PatientMr William Bogle
[PERS ID:3439]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr James Monteath (Monteith)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:591]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr Alexander Dunlop (Sanders, Saunders)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Glasgow Glasgow and West Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Mr Bogle
Dear Sir


I am favoured with yours concerning
Mr. Bogle and shall be very happy to contribute
to his recovery and permanent health and
dont doubt that I could do so, if his temper
and disposition could be rendered sufficiently
pliable. I suspect he has laid aside the de¬
coction which I thought might have been
of Service to all his complaints too soon. If
it is disagreeing with his Stomach [was?] real
and owing to the addition of the Mezereon
he might have been reconciled to it by em¬
ploying the Mezereon in half the quantity
I dont see much room at present for Advice
and as his Sores wear a good aspect and
seem to be healing I would not insist on
any further use of Mercury but I am so
constantly suspicious of the lingering nature




[Page 2]


of the Venereal taint and therefore ↑that↑ upon the least
untoward aspect of his Sores I would certainly
go to the Mercury again and I know from
frequent experience that it does not hurt
the Gout and I am pretty certain he was
mistaken in thinking that the Mercury
had brought it on. With respect to the
management of his Gout I must leave a good
deal to his own experience and to your and
Mr. Dunlops judgement who see the circum¬
stances every day but I am persuaded that
he judges very ill refusing the Anodyne
With respect to the Guaiacum I dont insist
upon it during Paroxysms of any vigour but
when any thing Atonic appears it is the
remedy to be depended on. But in the time
of Paroxysms I am Or even when these are
coming and going I am not fond further
the Spirituous tincture in Rum the




[Page 3]


Volatile Elixir and to either of them I would
prefer the Solution of the Guaiac in water


What I think you and he have especially
to attend to is his Regimen which should be
extremely temperate both in meat and drink
If you cannot persuade him to this you will
not readily mark the ↑a proper↑ Cure and if he will not
submitt to a regimen you may tell him from
me that he can neither get health
nor preserve it. The long continuance
of this illness has I hope broke
in very much upon his former habits and it
will be madness in him to take them up
again. With best wishes and Compliments
to him and to Mr. Dunlop I am


Dear James
Your most Obedient servant
William Cullen

Edinburgh 5th. July
1785

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Mr Bogle
Dear Sir


I am favoured with yours concerning
Mr. Bogle and shall be very happy to contribute
to his recovery and permanent health and
dont doubt that I could do so, if his temper
and disposition could be rendered sufficiently
pliable. I suspect he has laid aside the de¬
coction which I thought might have been
of Service to all his complaints too soon. If
it is disagreeing with his Stomach [was?] real
and owing to the addition of the Mezereon
he might have been reconciled to it by em¬
ploying the Mezereon in half the quantity
I dont see much room at present for Advice
and as his Sores wear a good aspect and
seem to be healing I would not insist on
any further use of Mercury but I am so
constantly suspicious of the lingering nature




[Page 2]


of the Venereal taint and therefore ↑that↑ upon the least
untoward aspect of his Sores I would certainly
go to the Mercury again and I know from
frequent experience that it does not hurt
the Gout and I am pretty certain he was
mistaken in thinking that the Mercury
had brought it on. With respect to the
management of his Gout I must leave a good
deal to his own experience and to your and
Mr. Dunlops judgement who see the circum¬
stances every day but I am persuaded that
he judges very ill refusing the Anodyne
With respect to the Guaiacum I dont insist
upon it during Paroxysms of any vigour but
when any thing Atonic appears it is the
remedy to be depended on. But in the time
of Paroxysms I am Or even when these are
coming and going I am not fond further
the Spirituous tincture in Rum the




[Page 3]


Volatile Elixir and to either of them I would
prefer the Solution of the Guaiac in water


What I think you and he have especially
to attend to is his Regimen which should be
extremely temperate both in meat and drink
If you cannot persuade him to this you will
not readily mark the ↑a proper↑ Cure and if he will not
submitt to a regimen you may tell him from
me that he can neither get health
nor preserve it. The long continuance
of this illness has I hope broke
in very much upon his former habits and it
will be madness in him to take them up
again. With best wishes and Compliments
to him and to Mr. Dunlop I am


Dear James
Your most Obedient servant
William Cullen

Edinr. 5th. July
1785

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