Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:5000] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Mr / Regarding: Mr S J (Patient), Anonymous (Patient) / 9 March 1785 / (Outgoing)

Reply, for 'S.J.', addressed to his friend. Cullen encloses 'a Powder put up in a manner the least likely to appear as a medicine', and advises on its application and the use of a truss. He also gives advice for their female friend.

Facsimile

There are 3 images for this document.

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[Page 2]


 

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 5000
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/17/194
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date9 March 1785
Annotation None
TypeMachine copy
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply, for 'S.J.', addressed to his friend. Cullen encloses 'a Powder put up in a manner the least likely to appear as a medicine', and advises on its application and the use of a truss. He also gives advice for their female friend.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:650]
Case of the anonymised "S .J.", who is being treated for a swollen testicle.
8
[Case ID:2519]
Case of a 'female friend' of S.J.
5


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:5837]AddresseeMr
[PERS ID:3102]Patient
[PERS ID:3101]PatientMr S J
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:5837]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendMr
[PERS ID:3101]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendMr S J
[PERS ID:3102]Patient's Relative / Spouse / Friend

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Alloa Mid Scotland Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
S. J.
Sir


I have received yours today but find
nothing new in it, but it is not new to me to find
that your friends ailment is slow and receding.
I dont think he will receive any benefit by
continuing the injection and therefore I have
not sent any more of it but I have sent
a medicine which I hope will be of great
Service. It is a Powder put up in a manner
the least likely to appear as a medicine. It
is wrapped up in many folds of paper and
you will please to take it out keeping it
as much as you can as it now lies flat
in a horizontal or level position. When
you come to the undermost take care to avoid
stirring the powder or raising it in dust for
that dust taken in to the mouth is not
very wholesome. When you have got at it



[Page 2]

you may keep it together and put it up {illeg}
in paper in the [form?] you find it most convenient.
Of this Powder you are to take a heaped Tea spoonfull
and put it into half a Mutchkin of the softest
Spring water and it would be still better if you
could boil that water and let it cool again
before you put the powder into it. With this
Solution he is to bathe the part affected
two or three times a day by dipping a fourfold
piece of linen Cloth and ap in it and applying
the Cloth to the part, washing a little and letting
the Cloth remain on till it is near dry, then
apply a but of flannel, the Wool and Truss
as usual. The liquor when it is employed
should be neither hot nor cold, but particularly
not the latter. This is the only remedy that
I propose to be employed at present and after
your friend has tried it for a week or two I
shall be glad to have his report. I need hardly




[Page 3]


say that {illeg} [with?] {illeg}
{illeg} &c. is still to be continued.


With regard to your friends friend I hope
nothing at all is further necessary but She
may continue now and then to inject some tepid
water
with an Eight part of french Brandy
mixed with it. Wishing heartily Success to
your friends. I am


Dear Sir
Your most Obedient Servant

Edinburgh 9th March
1785

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
S. J.
Sir


I have received yours today but find
nothing new in it, but it is not new to me to find
that your friends ailment is slow and receding.
I dont think he will receive any benefit by
continuing the injection and therefore I have
not sent any more of it but I have sent
a medicine which I hope will be of great
Service. It is a Powder put up in a manner
the least likely to appear as a medicine. It
is wrapped up in many folds of paper and
you will please to take it out keeping it
as much as you can as it now lies flat
in a horizontal or level position. When
you come to the undermost take care to avoid
stirring the powder or raising it in dust for
that dust taken in to the mouth is not
very wholesome. When you have got at it



[Page 2]

you may keep it together and put it up {illeg}
in paper in the [form?] you find it most convenient.
Of this Powder you are to take a heaped Tea spoonfull
and put it into half a Mutchkin of the softest
Spring water and it would be still better if you
could boil that water and let it cool again
before you put the powder into it. With this
Solution he is to bathe the part affected
two or three times a day by dipping a fourfold
piece of linen Cloth and ap in it and applying
the Cloth to the part, washing a little and letting
the Cloth remain on till it is near dry, then
apply a but of flannel, the Wool and Truss
as usual. The liquor when it is employed
should be neither hot nor cold, but particularly
not the latter. This is the only remedy that
I propose to be employed at present and after
your friend has tried it for a week or two I
shall be glad to have his report. I need hardly




[Page 3]


say that {illeg} [with?] {illeg}
{illeg} &c. is still to be continued.


With regard to your friends friend I hope
nothing at all is further necessary but She
may continue now and then to inject some tepid
water
with an Eight part of french Brandy
mixed with it. Wishing heartily Success to
your friends. I am


Dear Sir
Your most Obedient Servant

Edinr. 9th March
1785

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