Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:4728] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Dr / Regarding: Mr James? Wilkie (Captain Wilkie of Foulden?) (Patient) / 11 October 1783 / (Outgoing)

Reply 'For Capt. Wilkie'

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 4728
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/16/132
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date11 October 1783
Annotation None
TypeMachine scribal copy
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply 'For Capt. Wilkie'
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1840]
Case of Mr Wilkie who has recently developed a chest complaint marked by a cough, fever, breathlessness and spitting blood.
2


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:571]AddresseeDr Christopher Douglas (of Kelso)
[PERS ID:5110]PatientMr James? Wilkie (Captain Wilkie of Foulden?)
[PERS ID:571]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Christopher Douglas (of Kelso)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Lisbon Portugal Portugal Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Marseille South of France France Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Falmouth South-West England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other London London and South-East England Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]

For Captain Wilkie


Having considered attentively the whole circumstan¬
ces by past and present of the Captains complaints I
must give it as my opinion that he is threatened
with a Consumption but at the same time I am clear
that the disease is no ways confirmed or so much
advanced as to discourage any attempts for his
recovery and which I hope may by proper means
be entirely obtained.


His complaints are such as are commonly
rendered fatal by the accidents of the winter in
this Climate and I think he can have no security but
in repairing to a warm Climate for the ensuing winter
and as the Season is now so far advanced he ought
to make as much hast as possible in quitting this
Country.


The Climate either of Lisbon or Marseilles



[Page 2]

will answer his purpose and as a Voyage would be a
great part of his remedy, the former might be preferred
but as the Captain has some very good reasons for
preferring Marseilles he may take to it upon either
of the following conditions. If upon getting to London
he can find a Ship bound to Marseilles or any place
near to it ready to Sail and offering good accomoda¬
tion he may still enter upon that Voyage and even
may find benefit from the length of it or in the
second place if upon his going to London he can
immediately find as French or an English Servant
who has the French language who can therefore
supply his want of it and is willing to Travel
with him to Marseilles he may immediately
set out and travel thither by land and if he
takes sufficient care to avoid cold and fatigue
he may find almost as much benefit by the
Journey as he would have done by the Voyage


[Page 3]

Upon either of these conditions he may take his
course to Marseilles but if he cannot in one way
or other be accomodated properly and immediately
↑for this↑ he must think of going to Lisbon and may probably
very soon get a Passage for it from London and
by going to Falmouth he can always get the
Packet 1 immediately.


This is the chief part of the opinion and advice
that I have to offer and for what else is necessary
he seems already to have received very proper
directions particularly with respect to diet but
this subject minds me to say that if Captain Wilkie
enters upon a Voyage from London to Marseilles
↑or even to Lisbon↑ he must take care to lay in a stock of Provisions
suitable to himself and it will not be different
to do as it may consist entirely of Grain and fruit
and he is only to provide as great a variety of



[Page 4]

each as can be conveniently had and stored up and the
only addition to the grain and fruit that can be ne¬
cessary for him is some Portable Soup to make now
and then a little weak broth.


The issue in his breast is to be continued till
all pain of his breast or sides ceases to return
and if any pain returns with any violence
into a new part he should have a fresh blister
applied upon it. If I have any observation
to make on the Practice hitherto employed it
is that the Gentleman have been rather sparing
of the Captains blood and if still his symptoms
should occurr with any violence I would advise
some blood, never a great deal at once, to be
taken from his
Arms. I have only one other
remedy to suggest and that is Vomiting which,
practiced, although in as gentle a manner as
possible, may I think be of service in all his
complaints and if he finds it [so prove?] as may be frequently
practiced


William Cullen

Edinburgh 11th. October 1783

Notes:

1: A 'packet-boat' was a ship sailing a regular route between ports, originally for carrying mail, but latterly goods and passengers.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]

For Capt. Wilkie


Having considered attentively the whole circumstan¬
ces by past and present of the Captains complaints I
must give it as my opinion that he is threatened
with a Consumption but at the same time I am clear
that the disease is no ways confirmed or so much
advanced as to discourage any attempts for his
recovery and which I hope may by proper means
be entirely obtained.


His complaints are such as are commonly
rendered fatal by the accidents of the winter in
this Climate and I think he can have no security but
in repairing to a warm Climate for the ensuing winter
and as the Season is now so far advanced he ought
to make as much hast as possible in quitting this
Country.


The Climate either of Lisbon or Marseilles



[Page 2]

will answer his purpose and as a Voyage would be a
great part of his remedy, the former might be preferred
but as the Captain has some very good reasons for
preferring Marseilles he may take to it upon either
of the following conditions. If upon getting to London
he can find a Ship bound to Marseilles or any place
near to it ready to Sail and offering good accomoda¬
tion he may still enter upon that Voyage and even
may find benefit from the length of it or in the
second place if upon his going to London he can
immediately find as French or an English Servant
who has the French language who can therefore
supply his want of it and is willing to Travel
with him to Marseilles he may immediately
set out and travel thither by land and if he
takes sufficient care to avoid cold and fatigue
he may find almost as much benefit by the
Journey as he would have done by the Voyage


[Page 3]

Upon either of these conditions he may take his
course to Marseilles but if he cannot in one way
or other be accomodated properly and immediately
↑for this↑ he must think of going to Lisbon and may probably
very soon get a Passage for it from London and
by going to Falmouth he can always get the
Packet 1 immediately.


This is the chief part of the opinion and advice
that I have to offer and for what else is necessary
he seems already to have received very proper
directions particularly with respect to diet but
this subject minds me to say that if Capt. Wilkie
enters upon a Voyage from London to Marseilles
↑or even to Lisbon↑ he must take care to lay in a stock of Provisions
suitable to himself and it will not be different
to do as it may consist entirely of Grain and fruit
and he is only to provide as great a variety of



[Page 4]

each as can be conveniently had and stored up and the
only addition to the grain and fruit that can be ne¬
cessary for him is some Portable Soup to make now
and then a little weak broth.


The issue in his breast is to be continued till
all pain of his breast or sides ceases to return
and if any pain returns with any violence
into a new part he should have a fresh blister
applied upon it. If I have any observation
to make on the Practice hitherto employed it
is that the Gentleman have been rather sparing
of the Captains blood and if still his symptoms
should occurr with any violence I would advise
some blood, never a great deal at once, to be
taken from his
Arms. I have only one other
remedy to suggest and that is Vomiting which,
practiced, although in as gentle a manner as
possible, may I think be of service in all his
complaints and if he finds it [so prove?] as may be frequently
practiced


William Cullen

Edinr. 11th. Octr. 1783

Notes:

1: A 'packet-boat' was a ship sailing a regular route between ports, originally for carrying mail, but latterly goods and passengers.

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