Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:4690] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Dr Alexander Stevenson (Professor; of Dalgairn ) / Regarding: Mr Robert Barclay (Patient) / 15 August 1783 / (Outgoing)

Reply, for 'Mr Barclay'. For Captain Barclay's headaches, Cullen recommends Dovers Powder and opiates.

Facsimile

There are 2 images for this document.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 4690
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/16/94
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date15 August 1783
Annotation None
TypeMachine scribal copy
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply, for 'Mr Barclay'. For Captain Barclay's headaches, Cullen recommends Dovers Powder and opiates.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1402]
Case of Robert Barclay who suffers from bad headaches, especially at night, and swollen ankles.
8


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:563]AddresseeDr Alexander Stevenson (Professor; of Dalgairn )
[PERS ID:3244]PatientMr Robert Barclay
[PERS ID:563]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Alexander Stevenson (Professor; of Dalgairn )
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Capelrig House Crookfur Glasgow and West Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]

Mr. Barclay

Dear Doctor


I am at length minded of my duty to Mr.
Barclay by a letter from himself and to I to which I
send an Answer here inclosed (↑along with this↑). I find he is still
distressed with his headachs especially in the night
and that he still has the swelling of his Ancles and
I think has for relieving both he should take some
measures before he leaves home. What I would
propose is some gentle doses of Dovers Powder;
but I cannot advise them without consulting you.
I would particularly wish to know, what I think
you or he can tell me whether or not he has
ever taken Opiates and whether he is readily
disposed to sweat. If he bears opiates well I
would try the remedy but still with this caution
that I would begin with fifteen or twenty grains
of the powder and proceed further afterwards
as the trial shall direct. But if he has either



[Page 2]

used to have been much disturbed with Opiates or
has used formerly to have much headach after drin¬
king and with all this he is difficult to sweat
I will hesitate about the propriety of the medicine
I have mentioned and will rather try some other
but about those I will say nothing till I hear
that you or he are averse to the trial of the
Dover. I need not say to you that the Dover
Powder
is most properly given in the morning
or what is necessary in the proper conduct of it
through the day but I must say that I think
much depends upon the administration of it and
therefore let you yourself will look after it if
you possibly can. I have inclosed this letter to
him and if ever it comes to your hand I shall
soon after and especially after a trial of the
Dover beg to hear from ↑you↑.

Yours entirely

Wm Cullen

Edinburgh 15th. August
1783

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]

Mr. Barclay

Dear Dr.


I am at length minded of my duty to Mr.
Barclay by a letter from himself and to I to which I
send an Answer here inclosed (↑along with this↑). I find he is still
distressed with his headachs especially in the night
and that he still has the swelling of his Ancles and
I think has for relieving both he should take some
measures before he leaves home. What I would
propose is some gentle doses of Dovers Powder;
but I cannot advise them without consulting you.
I would particularly wish to know, what I think
you or he can tell me whether or not he has
ever taken Opiates and whether he is readily
disposed to sweat. If he bears opiates well I
would try the remedy but still with this caution
that I would begin with fifteen or twenty grains
of the powder and proceed further afterwards
as the trial shall direct. But if he has either



[Page 2]

used to have been much disturbed with Opiates or
has used formerly to have much headach after drin¬
king and with all this he is difficult to sweat
I will hesitate about the propriety of the medicine
I have mentioned and will rather try some other
but about those I will say nothing till I hear
that you or he are averse to the trial of the
Dover. I need not say to you that the Dover
Powder
is most properly given in the morning
or what is necessary in the proper conduct of it
through the day but I must say that I think
much depends upon the administration of it and
therefore let you yourself will look after it if
you possibly can. I have inclosed this letter to
him and if ever it comes to your hand I shall
soon after and especially after a trial of the
Dover beg to hear from ↑you↑.

Yours entirely

Wm Cullen

Edinr. 15th. August
1783

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