Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:4275] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Mr Alexander Copland (Coupland; of King's Grange) / Regarding: Mr Glassel (Glassell) (Patient) / 24 July 1778 / (Outgoing)

Reply, for 'Mr Glassel'.

Facsimile

There are 2 images for this document.

[Page 1]


 

[Page 2]


 
 

Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 4275
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/11/13
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date24 July 1778
Annotation None
TypeScribal copy ( includes Casebook Entry)
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply, for 'Mr Glassel'.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1080]
Case of Mr Glassel whose baffling feverish condition may stem from his former rheumatic complaint; he develops painful ankles, headaches and a bad stomach.
6


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:566]AddresseeMr Alexander Copland (Coupland; of King's Grange)
[PERS ID:2396]PatientMr Glassel (Glassell)
[PERS ID:566]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr Alexander Copland (Coupland; of King's Grange)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Dumfries Borders Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Mr Glassel


I am uncertain what is at the bottom of his com¬
plaints. He has some frequency of pulse & some
other symptoms of a feverish disposition but it takes
no determined form & may be merely a relic of his former
Rheumatic affection. For the present I would have
him observe the following regimen.


A light & cooling diet. a little light animal
food; but only a little; & make up his meal almost
entirely of Vegetables. He may take strawberries freely
at dinner & they may may make the whole of his
supper. Both at dinner & supper he may take
them with a little plain milk with a spoonful of
cream added to it. His breakfast should be of Cocoa
tea with dry toast.


His ordinary drink should be plain water taking
care that it is of a good kind or if it is doubtful, that
it be boiled and cooled again. In warm weather I
would have him abstain entirely from all kinds of
strong drink & to take no wine at all till I know
how his Stomach & pulse bear it.


Continue to dip in the sea every morning unless
he finds the little cough he has at present increases
upon it & if it do he must lay aside the bathing for
some days till the Cough go off. Take it in the
morning before breakfast; but not till after having
been out of bed an hour, & quite cool & free from
any moisture on his skin.


He may take breakfast as soon after as he
pleases & soon after breakfast he may get on horseback
& ride for 2 or 3 hours, more or less according to the wea¬
ther for he should avoid the heat of the Sun when it
is shone; Instead of riding in the middle of the day
better take an airing about 5 or 6 in the afternoon.
Ride gently, & avoid being heated by it. If his cough



[Page 2]

should oblige him to lay aside his bathing; he
should take his ride before breakfast.


Be often in the fresh air but never walk in
the Sun or so much as to be heated.


Avoid cold. Therefore avoid being very much heated
or in case he should be so, avoid a stream of cold
air. Avoid sitting down in wet linnen. He should
shift into dry linnen as soon as the exercise which
heated him is over. Never lay aside any part of
his cloathing, on account of weather; nor for the
sake of cooling himself when warm.


The free use of Vegetables will probably keep
his belly regular; but if not, he should take a dose
of pills as he has used to do. Purging is unne¬
cessary: & he should take no more of the pills
than to give one motion; & take them rather fre¬
quently than largely.


Continue the Tincture, till I hear from
him

Edinburgh July. 14. 1778
W. C.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Mr Glassel


I am uncertain what is at the bottom of his com¬
plaints. He has some frequency of pulse & some
other symptoms of a feverish disposition but it takes
no determined form & m. b. merely a relic of his former
Rheumatic affection. For the present I would have
him observe the following regimen.


A light & cooling diet. a little light animal
food; but only a little; & make up his meal almost
entirely of Vegetables. He may take strawberries freely
at dinner & they may may make the whole of his
supper. Both at dinner & supper he may take
them with a little plain milk w a spoonful of
cream added to it. His breakfast should be of Cocoa
tea with dry toast.


His ordinary drink should be plain water taking
care that it is of a good kind or if it is doubtful, that
it be boiled and cooled again. In warm weather I
would have him abstain entirely from all kinds of
strong drink & to take no wine at all till I know
how his Stomach & pulse bear it.


Continue to dip in the sea every morning unless
he finds the little cough he has at present increases
upon it & if it do he must lay aside the bathing for
some days till the Cough go off. Take it in the
morning before breakfast; but not till after having
been out of bed an hour, & quite cool & free from
any moisture on his skin.


He may take breakfast as soon after as he
pleases & soon after breakfast he may get on horseback
& ride for 2 or 3 hours, more or less accordg to the wea¬
ther for he should avoid the heat of the Sun when it
is shone; Instead of riding in the middle of the day
better take an airing about 5 or 6 in the afternoon.
Ride gently, & avoid being heated by it. If his cough



[Page 2]

should oblige him to lay aside his bathing; he
should take his ride before breakfast.


Be often in the fresh air but never walk in
the Sun or so much as to be heated.


Avoid cold. Therefore avoid being very much heated
or in case he should be so, avoid a stream of cold
air. Avoid sitting down in wet linnen. He should
shift into dry linnen as soon as the exercise which
heated him is over. Never lay aside any part of
his cloathing, on account of weather; nor for the
sake of cooling himself when warm.


The free use of Vegetables will probably keep
his belly regular; but if not, he should take a dose
of pills as he has used to do. Purging is unne¬
cessary: & he should take no more of the pills
than to give one motion; & take them rather fre¬
quently than largely.


Continue the Tincture, till I hear from
him

Edinr. July. 14. 1778
W. C.

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