Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:411] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: [ADDRESSEE UNKNOWN] / Regarding: Colonel Napier (Patient) / 19 October 1768 / (Outgoing)

Reply 'For Colonel Napier', signed by Cullen, Alexander Munro and Adam Austin

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 411
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/2/32
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date19 October 1768
Annotation None
TypeScribal copy ( includes Casebook Entry)
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe Yes
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply 'For Colonel Napier', signed by Cullen, Alexander Munro and Adam Austin
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:245]
Case of Colonel Napier who may be able to avoid surgery if he follows a strict regimen provided.
1


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1160]PatientColonel Napier
[PERS ID:89]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryProfessor Alexander Monro (secundus; Munro )
[PERS ID:1161]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Adam Austin
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:89]Supplemental AuthorProfessor Alexander Monro (secundus; Munro )
[PERS ID:1161]Supplemental AuthorDr Adam Austin

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
For Colonel Napier


We are now perswaded that with a little attention
in the way of surgery the Colonel may get the better
of all his ailments if he will give at the same time
a proper attention to his regimen This we think to
be absolutely necessary & therefore give here the
particulars as exactly & fully as we can His Diet
must in general be light & cool He must take no
meat or fish of any kind at supper but make that of
Grain or other Vegetables & of which he may take
his advise choice -- At Dinner he may take meat
every day but should never maake an entire meal of
it but fill it up with pudding or Vegetables - The
meats most proper are Beef, Mutton, Veal, Lamb, or
White fowl Rabbit & Tr↑i↑pe -- He must avoid entirely
all salted meats as also, Pork, Water fowl wild or Tame
Wild fowl of all kinds, Pidgeons or small birds --


Fish of any kind he must take very sparingly & the
only safe are Haddock, or Whiting boiled & served with
a very light Sauce. All kinds of shell fish we think very
improper.


We desire that the Cookery of his meat be plain roasting
& boiling & that all fryed & baked meats be avoided - He
must avoid {illeg} dishes rich sauces & all light seasoning
Mustard is the only safe one Vinegar & Pickles & all sower
sauces are very unfit for his gouty constitution.




[Page 2]


If he digest milk easily & it does not make him
costive it is very proper for him at Supper with any kind
of grain he likes. -- Of Vegetables he may take his
choice only let him avoid any that he finds growe windy or
cold upon his stomach -- Fruit he must certainly take
very sparingly. -- A fresh & soft boiled Egg he may
take sometimes but the taking Eggs frequently is not fit for
him -- For ordinary drink we think toast & water
the only safe & small beer very improper. He may
have a little madeira in his water but it ought not to
be above a fifth part. Spirits we do not judge proper
in any shape for his present ailments but on account
of his stomach we suppose the may be necessary and when
taken desire the may be always in a measured quantity.


Put to water a twelfth part of strong Rum is a good
proportion for ordinary drink & for a few glasses after dinner
the spirits should never be above an eight part. In either
he shouldne take above a Gill of Rum at any meal. The only
wines fit for his stomach are Madeira or Red Port but in his
present situation he should hardly ever take them without
water & even then he should never exceed half a Muchkin
of Wine at one meal When we mention these measures



[Page 3]

we do not suppose that he is to take both wine & spirits
at the same meal or if he does that the one is to be diminished
in pur proportion to the other. -- With this diet we think
the Colonel should endeavour to have as often as possible
fresh air & gentle Exercise & for this purpose go abroad
in a Carriage every forenoon that is tolerably dry & not very
cold but nothing is of more consequence to him than avoiding
Cold & therefore he should go abroad only ↑in a carriage↑, & in the forenoons
only. During the Winter being abroad in the afternoons &
or Evenings is totally inadmissable In the Carriage he
must take great to keep his feet & legs warm & manage
glass with direction -- A side glass down is very liable
to give Cold


Edinburgh October 19
1768

Wm Cullen
Am Austin
Ar Monro

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
For Colonel Napier


We are now perswaded that with a little attention
in the way of surgery the Colonel may get the better
of all his ailments if he will give at the same time
a proper attention to his regimen This we think to
be absolutely necessary & therefore give here the
particulars as exactly & fully as we can His Diet
must in general be light & cool He must take no
meat or fish of any kind at supper but make that of
Grain or other Vegetables & of which he may take
his advise choice -- At Dinner he may take meat
every day but should never maake an entire meal of
it but fill it up with pudding or Vegetables - The
meats most proper are Beef, Mutton, Veal, Lamb, or
White fowl Rabbit & Tr↑i↑pe -- He must avoid entirely
all salted meats as also, Pork, Water fowl wild or Tame
Wild fowl of all kinds, Pidgeons or small birds --


Fish of any kind he must take very sparingly & the
only safe are Haddock, or Whiting boiled & served with
a very light Sauce. All kinds of shell fish we think very
improper.


We desire that the Cookery of his meat be plain roasting
& boiling & that all fryed & baked meats be avoided - He
must avoid {illeg} dishes rich sauces & all light seasoning
Mustard is the only safe one Vinegar & Pickles & all sower
sauces are very unfit for his gouty constitution.




[Page 2]


If he digest milk easily & it does not make him
costive it is very proper for him at Supper with any kind
of grain he likes. -- Of Vegetables he may take his
choice only let him avoid any that he finds growe windy or
cold upon his stomach -- Fruit he must certainly take
very sparingly. -- A fresh & soft boiled Egg he may
take sometimes but the taking Eggs frequently is not fit for
him -- For ordinary drink we think toast & water
the only safe & small beer very improper. He may
have a little madeira in his water but it ought not to
be above a fifth part. Spirits we do not judge proper
in any shape for his present ailments but on account
of his stomach we suppose the may be necessary and when
taken desire the may be always in a measured quantity.


Put to water a twelfth part of strong Rum is a good
proportion for ordinary drink & for a few glasses after dinner
the spirits should never be above an eight part. In either
he shouldne take above a Gill of Rum at any meal. The only
wines fit for his stomach are Madeira or Red Port but in his
present situation he should hardly ever take them without
water & even then he should never exceed half a Muchkin
of Wine at one meal When we mention these measures



[Page 3]

we do not suppose that he is to take both wine & spirits
at the same meal or if he does that the one is to be diminished
in pur proportion to the other. -- With this diet we think
the Colonel should endeavour to have as often as possible
fresh air & gentle Exercise & for this purpose go abroad
in a Carriage every forenoon that is tolerably dry & not very
cold but nothing is of more consequence to him than avoiding
Cold & therefore he should go abroad only ↑in a carriage↑, & in the forenoons
only. During the Winter being abroad in the afternoons &
or Evenings is totally inadmissable In the Carriage he
must take great to keep his feet & legs warm & manage
glass with direction -- A side glass down is very liable
to give Cold


Edinr. Octr. 19
1768

Wm Cullen
Am Austin
Ar Monro

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