Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:4059] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Miss Anna Innes / Regarding: Miss Jean Innes (Jane) (Patient) / 16 May 1777 / (Outgoing)

Reply 'For Miss Jean Innes'. Cullen assures the recipient that she is not consumptive, but that her catarrhal condition needs care. Dietary and exercise advice follow. The coltsfoot (tussilago) recipe is given in English, in full, which suggests it may be for a family member/layperson (possibly her sister Anna?). Cullen recommends it in preference to Dr Brodie's use of opiates, as it is more "innocent".

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 4059
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/9/32
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date16 May 1777
Annotation None
TypeScribal copy ( includes Casebook Entry)
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe Yes
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply 'For Miss Jean Innes'. Cullen assures the recipient that she is not consumptive, but that her catarrhal condition needs care. Dietary and exercise advice follow. The coltsfoot (tussilago) recipe is given in English, in full, which suggests it may be for a family member/layperson (possibly her sister Anna?). Cullen recommends it in preference to Dr Brodie's use of opiates, as it is more "innocent".
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:455]
Case of Miss Jane Innes who has a long-term cough (consumption) which eventually proves fatal.
10


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1900]AddresseeMiss Anna Innes
[PERS ID:1899]PatientMiss Jean Innes (Jane)
[PERS ID:1898]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr David Brodie
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1900]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendMiss Anna Innes

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Elgin East Highlands Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
For Miss Jean Innes.


Not consumptive, or immediate danger, but such catarrhal com¬
plaints
long continuing may end ill. Therefore to remove them
she should travel which is better than any medicine & when she is settled
in any place, should be often on horseback.


Avoid cold -- a flannel shirt next her skin, night & day even thro
the Summer, nor to lay off any part of her winter dress, during the
summer. Keep her feet & legs always warm and dry. If they be
liable to be cold towards evening, she should have them well
warmed before lying down in bed, & wear during the night worsted
stockings or footsocks.


Diet as light & cool as her Stomach will bear. Sparing of
animal food at dinner; & at supper none. A little of her snail
milk
will be very proper for a supper. No tea at breakfast,
but rather Cocoa with a good deal of milk. -- Or she may take
fresh cows milk with an equal part of water gruel & either with
the Cocoa or with the milk & gruel may take dry toast with a very
little butter. May take ½ a pint of Asses milk in the morning
& may sleep after it if without sweating, but if she sweat she
should avoid sleeping by delaying the milk till near the time she
is to rise. If her cough become very bound she may take the
Expectorat Mixture prepared by Dr Brodie, but I hope she may
avoid it by employing a very innocent but effectual remedy
ordered below. -- if the cough become so frequent in the night
as to interrupt her sleep, she may take the Paregoric elixir
or syrup of poppies as Dr Brodie advises, but they should
be employed as seldom as possible. ---- No strong drink,
or malt liquors, hardly Porter; if it cause any heat it must
be let alone.


Take Fresh gathered leaves of Coltsfoot, cut them small



[Page 2]

& just cover them with boiling water, let them steep in this for an
hour or two, then put the whole into a pan over the fire till the liquor
begin to boil, taking care that the leaves do not sit to the bottom of the
Pan. When it is just beginning to boil take it off the fire, put it
into a strong coarse towel in which it is to be squeezed as strongly
as possible. To every pint English of the strained liquor add an
ounce of the finest lemonjuice of liquorice of if this be disagreable
2 ounces of sugar instead of it.
When the Liquorice or sugar is all dissolved, put the liquor
in a bottle close corked. Of this she should take 2 tablespoonfuls
3 or 4 times a day, & one dose of it at bedtime.
Prepare no more at a time than an English pint, keep it
very cool, & if it at any time fret or ferment, add to it when first
prepared a tablespoonful of the best double rum.

W.C.
Edinburgh May 16. 1777.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
For Miss Jean Innes.


Not consumptive, or immediate danger, but such catarrhal com¬
plaints
long continuing may end ill. Therefore to remove them
she should travel wc is better than any med. & when she is settled
in any place, should be often on horseback.


Avoid cold -- a flannel shirt next her skin, night & day even thro
the Summer, nor to lay off any part of her winter dress, during the
summer. Keep her feet & legs always warm and dry. If they be
liable to be cold towards evening, she should have them well
warmed before lying down in bed, & wear during the night worsted
stockings or footsocks.


Diet as light & cool as her Stomach will bear. Sparing of
animal food at dinner; & at supper none. A little of her snail
milk
will be very proper for a supper. No tea at breakfast,
but rather Cocoa w a good deal of milk. -- Or she may take
fresh cows milk w an equal part of water gruel & either with
the Cocoa or w the milk & gruel may take dry toast w a very
little butter. May take ½ a pint of Asses milk in the morng
& may sleep after it if wout sweating, but if she sweat she
should avoid sleepg by delayg the milk till near the time she
is to rise. If her cough become very bound she may take the
Expectorat ℳ. prepared by Dr Brodie, but I hope she may
avoid it by employg a very innocent but effectual remedy
ordered below. -- if the cough become so freqt in ye night
as to interrupt her sleep, she may take the Paregoric elixir
or syrup of poppies as Dr Brodie advises, but they should
be employed as seldom as possible. ---- No strong drink,
or malt liquors, hardly Porter; if it cause any heat it must
be let alone.


℞ Fresh gathered leaves of Coltsfoot, cut them small



[Page 2]

& just cover them with boiling water, let them steep in this for an
hour or two, then put the whole into a pan over the fire till the liquor
begin to boil, takg care that the leaves do not sit to the bottom of the
Pan. When it is just beginng to boil take it off the fire, put it
into a strong coarse towel in which it is to be squeezed as strongly
as possible. To every pint English of the strained liquor add an
ounce of the finest lemonjuice of liquorice of if this be disagreable
2 ounces of sugar instead of it.
When the Liquorice or sugar is all dissolved, put the liquor
in a bottle close corked. Of this she should take 2 tablespoonfuls
3 or 4 times a day, & one dose of it at bedtime.
Prepare no more at a time than an Engl. pint, keep it
very cool, & if it at any time fret or ferment, add to it when first
prepared a tablespoonf. of ye best double rum.

W.C.
Edinr. May 16. 1777.

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