Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:3749] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Mr Charles Innes / Regarding: Mr B. (Patient) / 2 August 1773 / (Outgoing)

Reply 'For Mr Charles Innes', concerning the case of 'Mr B', a youth whose symptoms are attributed to his 'fast Growing'.

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

[Page 1]


 

[Page 2]


 

[Page 3]


 

[Page 4]


 
 

Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 3749
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/5/12
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date2 August 1773
Annotation None
TypeScribal copy ( includes Casebook Entry)
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply 'For Mr Charles Innes', concerning the case of 'Mr B', a youth whose symptoms are attributed to his 'fast Growing'.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:130]
Case of the young 'Mr B.' whose symptoms are all attributed to 'fast growing'.
1


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1681]AddresseeMr Charles Innes
[PERS ID:1682]PatientMr B.
[PERS ID:1681]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr Charles Innes
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]

For Mr Charles Innes.


After considering all the circumstances of Mr Bs
complaints I am of opinion that all of them depend
upon his fast Growing and that a year or two
will restore him to perfect health but in the
mean time his weakly state is exposed to
many accidents and requires a great Deal of
attention. The following measures appear to be
especialy necessary: He should be much in the
fresh air and therefore should live for the most
part in the Country when the Weather is dry
he should much in the Open air avoiding however
the Sun at noon and the air of the evening. He
should be very moderate in all bodily Exercise
and therefore in walking should be always
on level Ground always at leisure and never long
at one tim. Nothing will Do him more service



[Page 2]

than being frequently on horse back but there
too his motion should be very gentle and
never pushed the length of fatigue the best
times are the morning and forenoon. While the
Days are long and the weather fine, he may
have a ride towards Evening but he must
not go out till two or three hours after Dinner.
He must always take great Care to avoid
cold and therefore all Damps and moistures
both within and without Doors. He must avoid
being unsteady in his Cloathing and being
heated by the sun, exercise, or warm Cham¬
bers. When sitting still he must Carefully
avoid being in any stream of air. He
should always go to bed early, should lie
in a large well aired chamber and


[Page 3]

Bedcloaths should be light. If he is to remain
in Scotland for the winter He should against
the middle of September put on a flannel shirt
and wear it next his skin night and day. He should
always get up betimes in the morning and sweating
should not Detain him abed only taking care
that his skin is well Dried and Dry linen
put on. His Diet should be chiefly of milk and
Grain avoiding much of animal food and also
much of Roots and Greens. At Dinner every
Day he may take a little meat or a little light
fish But if these occasion any heat or sweating
after Dinner he must Diminish the quantity
or abstain from them altogether. His Drink
must be toast water water gruel or barley water
Small beer is very improper. He may take a


[Page 4]

glass or two of Claret or french white wine after
Dinner but all the Stronger wines are improper
and even with respect to the Claret he must ob¬
serve as with respect to his meat that if any heat
is roused by the wine he must abstain from
it I have but one medicine to impose to him
and that is the Strengthening Pills alread ordered
He must at first take three of them twice a day
but after a few days if he finds them sit well on his
stomach and do not open his belly he must
take them three times a day that is in the
morning as well as noon and night.


W. C.

Edinburgh 2d August
1773

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]

For Mr Charles Innes.


After considering all the circumstances of Mr Bs
complaints I am of opinion that all of them depend
upon his fast Growing and that a year or two
will restore him to perfect health but in the
mean time his weakly state is exposed to
many accidents and requires a great Deal of
attention. The following measures appear to be
especialy necessary: He should be much in the
fresh air and therefore should live for the most
part in the Country when the Weather is dry
he should much in the Open air avoiding however
the Sun at noon and the air of the evening. He
should be very moderate in all bodily Exercise
and therefore in walking should be always
on level Ground always at leisure and never long
at one tim. Nothing will Do him more service



[Page 2]

than being frequently on horse back but there
too his motion should be very gentle and
never pushed the length of fatigue the best
times are the morning and forenoon. While the
Days are long and the weather fine, he may
have a ride towards Evening but he must
not go out till two or three hours after Dinner.
He must always take great Care to avoid
cold and therefore all Damps and moistures
both within and without Doors. He must avoid
being unsteady in his Cloathing and being
heated by the sun, exercise, or warm Cham¬
bers. When sitting still he must Carefully
avoid being in any stream of air. He
should always go to bed early, should lie
in a large well aired chamber and


[Page 3]

Bedcloaths should be light. If he is to remain
in Scotland for the winter He should against
the middle of September put on a flannel shirt
and wear it next his skin night and day. He should
always get up betimes in the morning and sweating
should not Detain him abed only taking care
that his skin is well Dried and Dry linen
put on. His Diet should be chiefly of milk and
Grain avoiding much of animal food and also
much of Roots and Greens. At Dinner every
Day he may take a little meat or a little light
fish But if these occasion any heat or sweating
after Dinner he must Diminish the quantity
or abstain from them altogether. His Drink
must be toast water water gruel or barley water
Small beer is very improper. He may take a


[Page 4]

glass or two of Claret or french white wine after
Dinner but all the Stronger wines are improper
and even with respect to the Claret he must ob¬
serve as with respect to his meat that if any heat
is roused by the wine he must abstain from
it I have but one medicine to impose to him
and that is the Strengthening Pills alread ordered
He must at first take three of them twice a day
but after a few days if he finds them sit well on his
stomach and do not open his belly he must
take them three times a day that is in the
morning as well as noon and night.


W. C.

Edin 2d Aug
1773

XML

XML file not yet available.

Feedback

Send us specfic feeback about this document [DOC ID:3749]

Type
Comments
 

Please note that the Cullen Project team have now disbanded but your comments will be logged in our system and we will look at them one day...