Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:3701] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Mr Aberdeen / Regarding: Mr Aberdeen (Patient) / 5 July 1774 / (Outgoing)

Reply 'For Mr Aberdeen' concerning managing the Gout and recommending a trip to Buxton before trying Peterhead.

Facsimile

There are 5 images for this document.

[Page 1]


 

[Page 2]


 

[Page 3]


 

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[Page 5]


 
 

Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 3701
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/4/26
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date5 July 1774
Annotation None
TypeScribal copy ( includes Casebook Entry)
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply 'For Mr Aberdeen' concerning managing the Gout and recommending a trip to Buxton before trying Peterhead.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:432]
Case of Mr Aberdeen who has the gout.
1


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1366]AddresseeMr Aberdeen
[PERS ID:1366]PatientMr Aberdeen
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1367]Other Physician / SurgeonDr Bullock
[PERS ID:852]Other Physician / SurgeonDr Thomas Livingston

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Buxton Midlands England Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Peterhead East Highlands Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]

For Mr Aberdeen


An hereditary disposition and what has already
happened leaves no doubt that Mr A is disposed to
Gout. This disposition is not to be eradicated
it is constantly lurking in the Body and when
it does not take to the extremities with proper
inflammation it produces various disorders some¬
times dangerous always troublesome and always
difficultly managed. The Different Symptoms
as they arise may be palliated by medicines No
Body is a better judge of these than Dr Living¬
ston and he seems to have employed the most
proper nor is it necessary for me to suggest any
as they must be adapted to particular circums¬
tances as they arise. But I must observe that
all medicines are palliatives only and do no¬
thing to mend the Constitution which must be
done by a Regimen strictly adressed to and it
is with respect to this only that I am to give
some observations. Nothing is more {illeg} (↑hurt¬
full↑
) to Gouty dispositions than much



[Page 2]

application to study or business and more if the
accidents of Business are ready to give flurry
or anxiety. It will be necessary therefore for
Mr Aberdeen to attend to this and to moderate
his application as far as possible to dwindle
the times of application and as well as he can
to keep out of the way of or guard against every
accident that may disturb him.


Nothing will be more usefull to Mr A.
than being much in the fresh air and taking
Gentle Exercise. Walking moderately may be
usefull but the effort of it is precarious &
while he continues to complain of the heat in his
feet his walking must be very moderate. Going
on horseback would be the most usefull but if
if he is not in the habit of that he must go in
a Carriage and by the length of way com¬
pensate the easiness of the motion. A single
horse chaise that he should drive himself is
nearly equal to reading riding.


Mr A. should as often as weather



[Page 3]

permits be frequently in such exercise but no exercise
near home is enough and he should at least once rather
twice a year take a journey for some weeks into
the country
together. He should just now go two
or three hundred miles further South travelling from
thirty to fifty miles a day and hardly more. He should
pursue the Journey very steadily but still so as
to avoid great rains or great heats.


It is possibile Mr A may be the better for
Buxton Waters both in drinking them and by
bathing in them But I am not certain of this and
therefore advise a cautous trial of them in the
course of his Journey he may go to Buxton and
if the weather is dry he may remain there some
time but if rainy there is more rain at Buxton
that at most other places and I advice MA to
leave the Place immediately as the benefits of
the waters will by no means compensate the
mischiefs of the Climate. If he remains at Buxton
he may drink the waters moderately and take the
Bath frequently. The Bath may be taken either
as a Cold or warm bath according to the time



[Page 4]

a person continues in it I would have Mr A
use it as a Warm Bath and to continue that &
the drinking for as longer or shorter time as
he finds may agree with him. I dont offer
more particular Directions because I would
have Mr A guided by a very Intelligent Physician
whom he will find at Buxton his name is Dr Bullock
Wherever Mr A is it is very necessary for him to
give particular Mention to his Diet which must
neither be full nor low. He may every day
at Dinner take at Bit of any plain meat but
should take it moderately filling up his meal with
a little soup some pudding and some vegetables
which he knows to be least windy. He may take
Raw berries and even some other fruit but always
very moderately He should take no other raw vegetables
as sallad Cucumber Celeri He may take of spiceries
moderately of mustard pretty freely. But no pickles
of any kind His ordinary Drink should be toast
water and he should take no kind of malt liquor not
ever porter of Wines he should take only of the


[Page 5]

strongest as Madeira or red port but of these he
must take very little and in my opinion never above
half & much [kin?] at Dinner. If at any time his stom¬
ach
is Disordered and it appears by want of appetite
[some?] Belchings much flattulence and other marks
of indigestion I would have him at such times
abstain from wine altogether and take to punch
without Sowring. Tea and Coffee both bad for
him and at Breakfast he may take a weak
chocolate Beef tea or Cocoa tea and with any of
these Dry toast with a little Butter. If he can go
without a supper altogether it will be right but if
accustomed to a meal of that kind some kind of
milk meat will be best without any wine after
it and only a little punch without Sowring
Nothing more usefull than going to Bed soon
and rising early. I have said nothing of Peter¬
head waters
how I believe they may be of service
But I am clear upon considering the matter that
he should first make his journey to the South
By Buxton and think of Peterhead afterward

Edinburgh 5 July 1774
W. C.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]

For Mr Aberdeen


An hereditary disposition and what has already
happened leaves no doubt that Mr A is disposed to
Gout. This disposition is not to be eradicated
it is constantly lurking in the Body and when
it does not take to the extremities with proper
inflammation it produces various disorders some¬
times dangerous always troublesome and always
difficultly managed. The Different Symptoms
as they arise may be palliated by medicines No
Body is a better judge of these than Dr Living¬
ston and he seems to have employed the most
proper nor is it necessary for me to suggest any
as they must be adapted to particular circums¬
tances as they arise. But I must observe that
all medicines are palliatives only and do no¬
thing to mend the Constitution which must be
done by a Regimen strictly adressed to and it
is with respect to this only that I am to give
some observations. Nothing is more {illeg} (↑hurt¬
full↑
) to Gouty dispositions than much



[Page 2]

application to study or business and more if the
accidents of Business are ready to give flurry
or anxiety. It will be necessary therefore for
Mr Aberdeen to attend to this and to moderate
his application as far as possible to dwindle
the times of application and as well as he can
to keep out of the way of or guard against every
accident that may disturb him.


Nothing will be more usefull to Mr A.
than being much in the fresh air and taking
Gentle Exercise. Walking moderately may be
usefull but the effort of it is precarious &
while he continues to complain of the heat in his
feet his walking must be very moderate. Going
on horseback would be the most usefull but if
if he is not in the habit of that he must go in
a Carriage and by the length of way com¬
pensate the easiness of the motion. A single
horse chaise that he should drive himself is
nearly equal to reading riding.


Mr A. should as often as weather



[Page 3]

permits be frequently in such exercise but no exercise
near home is enough and he should at least once rather
twice a year take a journey for some weeks into
the country
together. He should just now go two
or three hundred miles further South travelling from
thirty to fifty miles a day and hardly more. He should
pursue the Journey very steadily but still so as
to avoid great rains or great heats.


It is possibile Mr A may be the better for
Buxton Waters both in drinking them and by
bathing in them But I am not certain of this and
therefore advise a cautous trial of them in the
course of his Journey he may go to Buxton and
if the weather is dry he may remain there some
time but if rainy there is more rain at Buxton
that at most other places and I advice MA to
leave the Place immediately as the benefits of
the waters will by no means compensate the
mischiefs of the Climate. If he remains at Buxton
he may drink the waters moderately and take the
Bath frequently. The Bath may be taken either
as a Cold or warm bath according to the time



[Page 4]

a person continues in it I would have Mr A
use it as a Warm Bath and to continue that &
the drinking for as longer or shorter time as
he finds may agree with him. I dont offer
more particular Directions because I would
have Mr A guided by a very Intelligent Physician
whom he will find at Buxton his name is Dr Bullock
Wherever Mr A is it is very necessary for him to
give particular Mention to his Diet which must
neither be full nor low. He may every day
at Dinner take at Bit of any plain meat but
should take it moderately filling up his meal with
a little soup some pudding and some vegetables
which he knows to be least windy. He may take
Raw berries and even some other fruit but always
very moderately He should take no other raw vegetables
as sallad Cucumber Celeri He may take of spiceries
moderately of mustard pretty freely. But no pickles
of any kind His ordinary Drink should be toast
water and he should take no kind of malt liquor not
ever porter of Wines he should take only of the


[Page 5]

strongest as Madeira or red port but of these he
must take very little and in my opinion never above
half & much [kin?] at Dinner. If at any time his stom¬
ach
is Disordered and it appears by want of appetite
[some?] Belchings much flattulence and other marks
of indigestion I would have him at such times
abstain from wine altogether and take to punch
without Sowring. Tea and Coffee both bad for
him and at Breakfast he may take a weak
chocolate Beef tea or Cocoa tea and with any of
these Dry toast with a little Butter. If he can go
without a supper altogether it will be right but if
accustomed to a meal of that kind some kind of
milk meat will be best without any wine after
it and only a little punch without Sowring
Nothing more usefull than going to Bed soon
and rising early. I have said nothing of Peter¬
head waters
how I believe they may be of service
But I am clear upon considering the matter that
he should first make his journey to the South
By Buxton and think of Peterhead afterward

Edn 5 July 1774
W. C.

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