Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:3333] From: Dr John Gilchrist (of Speddoch) / To: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / Regarding: Mr Atkinson (Aitkinson ) (Patient) / 24 April 1788 / (Incoming)

Letter from Dr. John Gilchrist, 'For Mr. Atkinson', who suffers from diarrhœa, vomiting and biliousness. He describes the treatments he has employed, including prescriptions, and mentions that he has recommended a sea voyage to a warmer climate.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 3333
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/2/2229
Main Language English
Document Direction Incoming
Date24 April 1788
Annotation None
TypeAuthorial original
Enclosure(s) Enclosure(s) present
Autopsy No
Recipe Yes
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter from Dr. John Gilchrist, 'For Mr. Atkinson', who suffers from diarrhœa, vomiting and biliousness. He describes the treatments he has employed, including prescriptions, and mentions that he has recommended a sea voyage to a warmer climate.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:783]
Case of Mr Atkinson, whose symptoms of diarrhoea, vomiting and biliousness are attributed to a 'weakness of the alimentary canal'.
2


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:115]AuthorDr John Gilchrist (of Speddoch)
[PERS ID:1]AddresseeDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:4585]PatientMr Atkinson (Aitkinson )
[PERS ID:115]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr John Gilchrist (of Speddoch)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Dumfries Borders Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
For Mr. Atkinson


The duration and circumstances of Mr Atkinsons Complaints
with the causes which have contributed to produce them, he can himself
give a particular account of - The principal circumstances have
been frequent returns of a Diarrhœa, which however was much more
considerable and distressing to him several months ago than at
present, and attacks of Vomitings, frequently bilious. - Of late
he has been able to retain very little of his food on his stom¬
ach
; and has for a long time been debilitated and emaciated to
a great degree; - though he has hitherto been for the most part
entirely free from fever; - and there has been no appearance of
swelling of his legs, or other symptoms of a similar nature;
which has all along induced me to entertain hopes of his re¬
covery - He has at times been troubled with a Cough, but
never continuing long, nor increasing much;- and his expec¬
toration has not been at any time particularly alarming
either in quantity or quality.


The remedies which Mr Atkinson has been using for
these four or five months past have been the following,
given, as he can easily explain, according to the Complaints
at the time - existing, - and the several degrees of them.


Saline draughts, swallowed in the state of Effervescence,
for which he generally had at hand - Salt of Wormwood Eight
Scruples, dissolved in four ounces of Water; - One spoonful
of this solution was swallowed along with an equal quantity
of Fresh lemon juice.


Emetics occasionally, which he was always fond to take




[Page 2]


as they generally relieved him. His common Emetic was
Ipecacuanha grana XII or VX - with Tartar emetic granum I.


He used pretty often the Pills which which all mentioned
below; ---


When the Diarrhœa was particularly troublesome he used
the Infusion for which the prescription is likewise given


Demulcent drinks were used occasionally when the Diarrhœa
required them - together with Decoction of Logwood, and
other simple astringents


Opiates were frequently employed when pain and bad nights
required them. Thirty drops at most, of Laudanum, was always enough -


He has lately been using the simple Tincture of the
Bark
as a stomachic.


Easy traveling, in such a manner as his Strength
will bear, and particularly a long Sea Voyage, to a steadier
and warmer climate, is what I have all along recommended
and do now recommend to Mr Atkinson, as the likeliest means
to remove his Complaints, and strengthen debilitated
constitution
, - and I think he should lose no time in carrying
them into execution.

John Gilchrist. M. D.
Dumfries 24th April 1788.



[Page 3]
Astringent Infusion

Take one ounce of Powdered Peruvian Bark, Pomegranate Bark, one and a half drachms of Red Rose Flowers, six drachms of powdered Gum arabic and twenty four ounces of boiling Water. Rest overnight and strain through a wooden strainer, adding half an ounce of Tincture of Kino and one ounce of Tincture of Cinnamon. Take two Spoonfuls a day.

Strengthening Pills

Take one drachm of powdered Columbo Root, one scruple of Extract of Gentian, twelve grains of Sal Martis and four grains of pure Opium. Grind into a mass and divide into twenty-four, of which two are to be taken every six hours.


An attention to his diet shall be very necessary in Mr
Atkinson's, and the avoiding of everything that may oppress his
stomach
, - though he should be obliged to abstain from What his
inclination leads him to. --- Perhaps the ripe Summer fruits
particularly Strawberries, and such fresh Vegetables as do not
prove flatulent may be of use to him.




[Page 4]


Mr. Aitkinson
May 1788
V. XIX. P. 462.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
For Mr. Atkinson


The duration and circumstances of Mr Atkinsons Complaints
with the causes which have contributed to produce them, he can himself
give a particular account of - The principal circumstances have
been frequent returns of a Diarrhœa, which however was much more
considerable and distressing to him several months ago than at
present, and attacks of Vomitings, frequently bilious. - Of late
he has been able to retain very little of his food on his stom¬
ach
; and has for a long time been debilitated and emaciated to
a great degree; - though he has hitherto been for the most part
entirely free from fever; - and there has been no appearance of
swelling of his legs, or other symptoms of a similar nature;
which has all along induced me to entertain hopes of his re¬
covery - He has at times been troubled with a Cough, but
never continuing long, nor increasing much;- and his expec¬
toration has not been at any time particularly alarming
either in quantity or quality.


The remedies which Mr Atkinson has been using for
these four or five months past have been the following,
given, as he can easily explain, according to the Complaints
at the time - existing, - and the several degrees of them.


Saline draughts, swallowed in the state of Effervescence,
for which he generally had at hand - Salt of Wormwood Eight
Scruples, dissolved in four ounces of Water; - One spoonful
of this solution was swallowed along with an equal quantity
of Fresh lemon juice.


Emetics occasionally, which he was always fond to take




[Page 2]


as they generally relieved him. His common Emetic was
Ipecacuan gr XII or VX - with Tartar emet. gr. I.


He used pretty often the Pills which which all mentioned
below; ---


When the Diarrhœa was particularly troublesome he used
the Infusion for which the prescription is likewise given


Demulcent drinks were used occasionally when the Diarrhœa
required them - together with Decoction of Logwood, and
other simple astringents


Opiates were frequently employed when pain and bad nights
required them. Thirty drops at most, of Laudanum, was always enough -


He has lately been using the simple Tincture of the
Bark
as a stomachic.


Easy traveling, in such a manner as his Strength
will bear, and particularly a long Sea Voyage, to a steadier
and warmer climate, is what I have all along recommended
and do now recommend to Mr Atkinson, as the likeliest means
to remove his Complaints, and strengthen debilitated
constitution
, - and I think he should lose no time in carrying
them into execution.

John Gilchrist. M. D.
Dumfries 24th April 1788.



[Page 3]
Astringent Infusion


Pulv: Cort. Peruv. ℥j.
Cort: Granatorum ℥ſs.
Flor: Ros. rub: ʒiſs.
Gum: arab: pulv ʒvj.
Aq: bullient: ℥xxiv.
Digere per noctem et lignaci colato adde.
Tinct: e Kino ℥ſs.
--- Cinamomi ℥j.
Capiat per in dies Cochlearia duo.

Strengthening Pills


Rad: Columb: pulv: subt: ʒj.
Extr. Gentian. ℈j.
Sal. Martis. gr xjj
Opii pur. gr. iv.
Contunde in massam et divide in pilulas viginti qua¬
tuor quarum sumantur duæ sexta quaque hora


An attention to his diet shall be very necessary in Mr
Atkinson's, and the avoiding of everything that may oppress his
stomach
, - though he should be obliged to abstain from What his
inclination leads him to. --- Perhaps the ripe Summer fruits
particularly Strawberries, and such fresh Vegetables as do not
prove flatulent may be of use to him.




[Page 4]


Mr. Aitkinson
May 1788
V. XIX. P. 462.

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