Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:258] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Dr Alexander Taylor (Sanders) / Regarding: Mr Robert Neilson (Nielson, of Paisley) (Patient), Mr William Orr ((later) of Ingliston, then Ralston) (Patient) / 25 January 1782 / (Outgoing)

Reply to Alexander Taylor about Mr William Orr's case: 'Your account of Mr Orrs hereditary disposition gives me a worse opinion of his ailment and makes me fear it may be of difficult cure'. He also briefly mentions the post mortem examination of Mr Neilson.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 258
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/14/144
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date25 January 1782
Annotation None
TypeMachine copy
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply to Alexander Taylor about Mr William Orr's case: 'Your account of Mr Orrs hereditary disposition gives me a worse opinion of his ailment and makes me fear it may be of difficult cure'. He also briefly mentions the post mortem examination of Mr Neilson.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:316]
Case of Mr Robert Neilson with a chronic, progressive illness, probably pulmonary (consumption) but possible cardiac. After a gap, in early January 1782, Cullen confirms that Neilson's condition is terminal. An autopsy soon follows.
22
[Case ID:554]
Case of William Orr who has an eye condition.
13


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:207]AddresseeDr Alexander Taylor (Sanders)
[PERS ID:211]PatientMr William Orr ((later) of Ingliston, then Ralston)
[PERS ID:206]PatientMr Robert Neilson (Nielson, of Paisley)
[PERS ID:207]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Alexander Taylor (Sanders)
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Paisley Glasgow and West Scotland Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Mr Taylor Concerning Mr Orr.
Dear Sir


I have formerly had so much friendly
connection with many of your relations that I was always
disposed to shew you every civility in my power and you may
depend upon my continuing to do so.


Your account of Mr Orrs hereditary disposition gives
me a worse opinion of his ailment and makes me fear it may
be ↑of↑ difficult cure. Though I am well perswaded there is no in¬
flammatory affection of
his retina it is very possible that a laxity
of
the vessels there may admit an afflux of blood and a turgescence
of
the vessels which may increase sensibility and his feeling pain
in the ball of the eye from the smallest pressure seems to shew
some fullness of the vessels. However this may be I am clear
that bathing the head with cold water may be ↑a↑ remedy and the
eruption
being more out of the way I would try it immediately.
He may begin with washing but you must proceed to pouring
from the pipe of a teakettle on the crown of his head. The
dipping his face in a bason of water and opening his eyes under
the water I have commonly found very usefull and tho a little



[Page 2]

uneasy at first it becomes easier on repetition. Upon practising
it it will always be proper to keep his eyes in the dark for a
little after. However if it does continue to be very uneasy
I would not insist on it. I find nothing to add to my form[er]
advice but the bathing of the head and you must go farther
in the course proposed before I can be led to alter it. In the
mean time be pleased to observe if at any time there are any
marks of fullness in
the vessels of the Eye. I cannot think
that I should learn so much by seeing Mr Orr as to give him
the trouble of a Journey to Edinburgh at this season.


I am much obliged to you for your account of the dis¬
section of Mr Neilson and I might give you some remarks
on the subject but I am so extremely hurried at present that
I have hardly found time for what I have written. I was
lately obliged to refuse a call that would have led me throug[h]
Paisley and possibly I may have another soon when I can comp[ly]
with it. I am most sincerely Dear Sir

your most obedient servan[t]
William Cullen
Edinburgh 25 January
1782. ––––

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Mr Taylor C Mr Orr.
Dear Sir


I have formerly had so much friendly
connection with many of your relations that I was always
disposed to shew you every civility in my power and you may
depend upon my continuing to do so.


Your account of Mr Orrs hereditary disposition gives
me a worse opinion of his ailment and makes me fear it may
be ↑of↑ difficult cure. Though I am well perswaded there is no in¬
flammatory affection of
his retina it is very possible that a laxity
of
the vessels there may admit an afflux of blood and a turgescence
of
the vessels which may increase sensibility and his feeling pain
in the ball of the eye from the smallest pressure seems to shew
some fullness of the vessels. However this may be I am clear
that bathing the head with cold water may be ↑a↑ remedy and the
eruption
being more out of the way I would try it immediately.
He may begin with washing but you must proceed to pouring
from the pipe of a teakettle on the crown of his head. The
dipping his face in a bason of water and opening his eyes under
the water I have commonly found very usefull and tho a little



[Page 2]

uneasy at first it becomes easier on repetition. Upon practising
it it will always be proper to keep his eyes in the dark for a
little after. However if it does continue to be very uneasy
I would not insist on it. I find nothing to add to my form[er]
advice but the bathing of the head and you must go farther
in the course proposed before I can be led to alter it. In the
mean time be pleased to observe if at any time there are any
marks of fullness in
the vessels of the Eye. I cannot think
that I should learn so much by seeing Mr Orr as to give him
the trouble of a Journey to Edinburgh at this season.


I am much obliged to you for your account of the dis¬
section of Mr Neilson and I might give you some remarks
on the subject but I am so extremely hurried at present that
I have hardly found time for what I have written. I was
lately obliged to refuse a call that would have led me throug[h]
Paisley and possibly I may have another soon when I can comp[ly]
with it. I am most sincerely Dear Sir

your most obedient servan[t]
William Cullen
Edr. 25 Jan.ry
1782. ––––

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