Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:2269] From: Dr Colin Ross / To: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / Regarding: Mr John Parish (J.P.; Mr P.) (Patient) / 25 March 1783 / (Incoming)

Letter from Colin Ross, Hamburg, concerning the case of J. P. (John Parish), a middle-aged man with a sarcocele and a history of chronic gonorrhea, who now has bouts of fever as well as strangury. The payment will be given by Mr Johnstone (Rev. Dr David Johnstone) of Leith.

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

[Page 1]


 

[Page 2]


 

[Page 3]


 

[Page 4]


 
 

Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 2269
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/2/1328
Main Language English
Document Direction Incoming
Date25 March 1783
Annotation None
TypeAuthorial original
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter from Colin Ross, Hamburg, concerning the case of J. P. (John Parish), a middle-aged man with a sarcocele and a history of chronic gonorrhea, who now has bouts of fever as well as strangury. The payment will be given by Mr Johnstone (Rev. Dr David Johnstone) of Leith.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1664]
Case of 'J. P.' [identified as likely being John Parrish] an unnamed male patient with a urinary disorder as reported by Colin Ross in Hamburg.
4


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:2968]AuthorDr Colin Ross
[PERS ID:1]AddresseeDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:3613]PatientMr John Parish (J.P.; Mr P.)
[PERS ID:2968]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Colin Ross
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:5904]Other Physician / SurgeonMr Jacques Daran
[PERS ID:3617]OtherReverend David Johnstone (Johnston; Dr Johnstone)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Hamburg Germany Germany Europe certain
Destination of Letter Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Leith Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Hamburg 25th March 1783
Sir


I request your attention to the following case,
taken partly from the relations of the patient and partly
from memory, therefore not so circumstantial as I could
wish, however hope you will be able to thrown some light
on the nature of it, & give us some assistance.


A middle aged man, descended of unhealthy parents, had
from infancy a sarcocele, but which, since he hase worn a
suspensory
has not encreased, or given inconveniency, was
in youth subject to megrim, sometimes cholera.


Has always been of a chearful disposition, active, of intense
application to business requiring much thought & writing.


Upwards of twenty years ago was treated for a Gonorrhœa
with acrid injections and roug medecines. This left a Gleet, for
which besides other remedies, antivenereals were employed, the
Gleet
remains but gives him no concern.


Some years after the Gonorrhœa a difficulty in making
urine
required Bougies, Darans were principally used, 1 and
were supposed to do some service, but he never passes his
urine in a full stream. ––––


During the use of the Bougies, as well as before & since, the
strangury encreased
sometimes to an entire suppression, with the
most painful urgings
, so as to require warm bath, opiats &
Demulcents.


These three years past his Urine has generally deposi¬
ted a slimy glutinous sediment, in quantity from half of a



[Page 2]

spoonfull to about two or three spoonfulls; various also in
regard to the time it requires to settle, and in degree of tenacity.


Sometimes it comes away already separate from the Urine,
or soon falls to the bottom of the Glass & then generally is dis¬
charged with more or less difficulty & pain, previous tenesmus,
sometimes (but now rarely) a temporary suppression, probably
of the spasmodic kind.


At othertimes it remains mixed with and suspended in the
urine for hours, perhaps a whole day or day & night are
required for its entire deposition ↑the acquiring its usual viscidity↑ & firm adhesion to the contain¬
ing vessel.


It likewise happens especially after some of the feverish
fits
(next to be mentioned) that the sediment is well concocted,
remixing easily, uniformly & entirely with the Urine on
slight agitation. In this ↑& the last mentioned↑ case the Urine is passed with toler¬
able ease & freedom.


He has no pain in the back nor stomach, nor particular
sickness at stomach, nor any pain in the region of the
Bladder
, or adjacent parts, except only when the tenacity of the
slime
occasions some d additional difficulty, or gives or is
accompanied with irritation, nor dos any kind of exercise,
jolting, or long continued riding give him any sort of uneasiness.


He has likewise for several years back been subject to
Fevers –– each single fit of which resembles that of a regular
tertian
, but the return of the fit is uncertain, he has perhaps
two or three or more successive fits, returning like the quotidean,
tertian, quartan, even the fifth day
, perhaps only one or two fits
after an interval
of ten or fourteen days, or three Weeks, or a
longer time: it ↑and any extraordinary difficulty in passing his Urine has even kept off many months when traveling



[Page 3]

or enjoying a different climat. The most distressing symptom
during the fit is a throbbing pain & confusion in the head,
bordering on delirium.


Sometimes he is pale, somewhat dejected, & chillish a day; or
two before the fever seizes him; at other times it comes on of a
sudden, when apparently in the best health and spirits


He is very low just after a fit, especially if not entirely
critical, but soon recovers his looks and chearfulness, if there
has been but few repetions; and is perfectly free from complaints
in the intervals, excepting more or less of the urinary, has a
good appetite, can pursue business & take his usual excercise,
but is generally costive.


A dry state of the atmosphere & exercise, in the Country
keep off, or evidently retard the return of the fever and other
complaint –– Foggy weather & much application to
sedentary business tend to bring the fever on.


The patient adds here in dry & warm weather I seldom
have any complaints, the least cold I catch generally
brings on a fit of the fever.


The Bark has sometimes been given as a restorative when
he was more than usually weakened by a numerous repetition of the
feverish fits
– and sometimes when the fever seemed to approach more
to the nature of an ague it has been given with a view to supress it
in which it did not always succeed, but never apparently did any
harm – upon the whole Bark seemd to agree with him.


Since when the tenacity of the slime was more than ordinary
troublesom & the weather prevented his taking exercise, Limewater
was drank for a couple of Weeks
to 1 or 2 pints in a day. During
this course the slime was less consistent, better mixed with his
water, & more and the Urine more easily discharged. Pyrmont
Water was drank aferwards
for the space of a few weeks, till a



[Page 4]

return of the fever
occasioned it to be laid aside.


We beg Dear Sir to be favoured with your opinion
concerning the nature of this fever, the sourse of the
slime discharged with the Urine
, & the means of relief.

I retain Dear Sir the most grateful sense
of the many obligations I am under to your goodness
and remain with the highest esteeme your most
obedient & most humble servant
Colin Ross

P.S. Mr Johnstone of Leith will present
a fee from my Patient

✍ Mr Colin Ross ––––
March 1783.

Notes:

1: See Jaques Deran,Précis, contenant quelques observations sur la manière de traiter les maladies de l'urétre, par le moyen des bougies, translated as A short narrative of the effects of a medicine that cures the disorders of the urethra by the means of medicated candles.(London: 1765?)

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Hamburg 25th March 1783
Sir


I request your attention to the following case,
taken partly from the relations of the patient and partly
from memory, therefore not so circumstantial as I could
wish, however hope you will be able to thrown some light
on the nature of it, & give us some assistance.


A middle aged man, descended of unhealthy parents, had
from infancy a sarcocele, but which, since he hase worn a
suspensory
has not encreased, or given inconveniency, was
in youth subject to megrim, sometimes cholera.


Has always been of a chearful disposition, active, of intense
application to business requiring much thought & writing.


Upwards of twenty years ago was treated for a Gonorrhœa
with acrid injections and roug medecines. This left a Gleet, for
which besides other remedies, antivenereals were employed, the
Gleet
remains but gives him no concern.


Some years after the Gonorrhœa a difficulty in making
urine
required Bougies, Darans were principally used, 1 and
were supposed to do some service, but he never passes his
urine in a full stream. ––––


During the use of the Bougies, as well as before & since, the
strangury encreased
sometimes to an entire suppression, with the
most painful urgings
, so as to require warm bath, opiats &
Demulcents.


These three years past his Urine has generally deposi¬
ted a slimy glutinous sediment, in quantity from half of a



[Page 2]

spoonfull to about two or three spoonfulls; various also in
regard to the time it requires to settle, and in degree of tenacity.


Sometimes it comes away already separate from the Urine,
or soon falls to the bottom of the Glass & then generally is dis¬
charged with more or less difficulty & pain, previous tenesmus,
sometimes (but now rarely) a temporary suppression, probably
of the spasmodic kind.


At othertimes it remains mixed with and suspended in the
urine for hours, perhaps a whole day or day & night are
required for its entire deposition ↑the acquiring its usual viscidity↑ & firm adhesion to the contain¬
ing vessel.


It likewise happens especially after some of the feverish
fits
(next to be mentioned) that the sediment is well concocted,
remixing easily, uniformly & entirely with the Urine on
slight agitation. In this ↑& the last mentioned↑ case the Urine is passed with toler¬
able ease & freedom.


He has no pain in the back nor stomach, nor particular
sickness at stomach, nor any pain in the region of the
Bladder
, or adjacent parts, except only when the tenacity of the
slime
occasions some d additional difficulty, or gives or is
accompanied with irritation, nor dos any kind of exercise,
jolting, or long continued riding give him any sort of uneasiness.


He has likewise for several years back been subject to
Fevers –– each single fit of which resembles that of a regular
tertian
, but the return of the fit is uncertain, he has perhaps
two or three or more successive fits, returning like the quotidean,
tertian, quartan, even the fifth day
, perhaps only one or two fits
after an interval
of ten or fourteen days, or three Weeks, or a
longer time: it ↑and any extraordinary difficulty in passing his Urine has even kept off many months when traveling



[Page 3]

or enjoying a different climat. The most distressing symptom
during the fit is a throbbing pain & confusion in the head,
bordering on delirium.


Sometimes he is pale, somewhat dejected, & chillish a day; or
two before the fever seizes him; at other times it comes on of a
sudden, when apparently in the best health and spirits


He is very low just after a fit, especially if not entirely
critical, but soon recovers his looks and chearfulness, if there
has been but few repetions; and is perfectly free from complaints
in the intervals, excepting more or less of the urinary, has a
good appetite, can pursue business & take his usual excercise,
but is generally costive.


A dry state of the atmosphere & exercise, in the Country
keep off, or evidently retard the return of the fever and other
complaint –– Foggy weather & much application to
sedentary business tend to bring the fever on.


The patient adds here in dry & warm weather I seldom
have any complaints, the least cold I catch generally
brings on a fit of the fever.


The Bark has sometimes been given as a restorative when
he was more than usually weakened by a numerous repetition of the
feverish fits
– and sometimes when the fever seemed to approach more
to the nature of an ague it has been given with a view to supress it
in which it did not always succeed, but never apparently did any
harm – upon the whole Bark seemd to agree with him.


Since when the tenacity of the slime was more than ordinary
troublesom & the weather prevented his taking exercise, Limewater
was drank for a couple of Weeks
to 1 or 2 pints in a day. During
this course the slime was less consistent, better mixed with his
water, & more and the Urine more easily discharged. Pyrmont
Water was drank aferwards
for the space of a few weeks, till a



[Page 4]

return of the fever
occasioned it to be laid aside.


We beg Dear Sir to be favoured with your opinion
concerning the nature of this fever, the sourse of the
slime discharged with the Urine
, & the means of relief.

I retain Dear Sir the most grateful sense
of the many obligations I am under to your goodness
and remain with the highest esteeme your most
obedient & most humble servant
Colin Ross

P.S. Mr Johnstone of Leith will present
a fee from my Patient

✍ Mr Colin Ross ––––
March 1783.

Notes:

1: See Jaques Deran,Précis, contenant quelques observations sur la manière de traiter les maladies de l'urétre, par le moyen des bougies, translated as A short narrative of the effects of a medicine that cures the disorders of the urethra by the means of medicated candles.(London: 1765?)

XML

XML file not yet available.

Feedback

Send us specfic feeback about this document [DOC ID:2269]

Type
Comments
 

Please note that the Cullen Project team have now disbanded but your comments will be logged in our system and we will look at them one day...