Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:216] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Anonymous / Regarding: Mrs Hodgson (Patient) / 31 October 1781 / (Outgoing)

Reply giving Directions for Mrs Hodgson, chiefly to avoid cold, but also dietary. Cullen does not believe she has consumption, but he prescribes two medicines as back-up in case change of diet is not a sufficient remedy for her symptoms. Instructions for making up the pectoral pills include that they are to be coated with gold.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 216
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/14/102
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date31 October 1781
Annotation None
TypeMachine copy
Enclosure(s) Enclosure(s) present
Autopsy No
Recipe Yes
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply giving Directions for Mrs Hodgson, chiefly to avoid cold, but also dietary. Cullen does not believe she has consumption, but he prescribes two medicines as back-up in case change of diet is not a sufficient remedy for her symptoms. Instructions for making up the pectoral pills include that they are to be coated with gold.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1419]
Case of Mrs Hodgson who, in Cullen's opinion, does not have a 'confirmed consumption'.
1


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:4521]Addressee
[PERS ID:4520]PatientMrs Hodgson
[PERS ID:4521]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / Apothecary
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Cullen's House / Mint Close Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
For Mrs Hodgson


Tho Mrs Hodgsons ailments have now Subsisted
very long and reduced her very much I am Still of opinion
that She is in no confirmed Consumption and hope that
by attention and care She may be greatly relieved and
preserved very long tho it may not be possible to restore
her to her former flesh and Strength.


Her first and great care must be ↑to↑ avoid cold and for
this purpose to be always warmly cloathed with flannel
or woollen every where next her Skin. She must also --
avoid all damp and moisture and any Stream of cold Air.
For the winter She may Sometimes in very mild weather
go abroad on horseback or in a carriage but Should never
walk out on foot and in cold frosty or even very wet weather
She Should keep very close at home.


She Should carefully avoid any the least bodily --
fatigue and therefore much walking or even Stirring much
within doors would be very bad for her but in very mild



[Page 2]

weather even in winter and more especially in the milder
seasons She will be much the better for going abroad either
on horseback behind a man or in a carriage.


In diet She will bear no Strong meat and Should not
not attempt to take it. At dinner She may Sometimes
take a bit of chicken, or rabbit, a bit of tripe or a Sweetbread
a little boiled veal or lamb or a little boiled whitefish as --
haddock, whiting or flounder but even of these She Should
take seldom and Sparingly. Her diet Should consist
chiefly of milk and grain as bread, rice, barley, Sago or
oatmeal and these prepared in any manner She likes best.
Instead of plain milk She may very often take buttermilk
but neither the buttermilk nor the milk that it is made
from Should be long kept and the best kind of buttermilk
is that which is made ↑immediately↑ from fresh Cows milk. Beside
Cows milk Mrs Hodgson if She can have it conveniently
may take Asses milk twice a day and when She either
takes this or warm Cows milk in the morning She may
Safely put a little rum or brandy into the milk.



[Page 3]

Besides grain Mrs Hodgson may take some other vegetables
Roots or greens but She must take care to avoid the colder
and more windy kinds. Potatoes is one of the Safest roots
and fruit of any kind that does not manifestly purge her
is otherwise very proper for her.


In drinking She must keep to water or watery li¬
quors as toast water, milk & water, water gruel or barley
water and all fermented or Spirituous liquors are
likely to do her harm and particularly malt liquor of
any kind.


By attending to these particulars of regimen I
hope Mrs Hodgson may have as much health and ease
as the present State of her constitution will admit of
and I think there are few medicines that can be of Ser¬
vice to her. I have only to propose two that may --
occasionally be usefull and I have prescribed them on a
paper apart.


One of them is a [box?] of pills which are intended
for removing obstructions in her breast and therefore



[Page 4]

when her breathing is a little more uneasy than usual let
her take two of these pills every night at bedtime for a
week or a fortnight.


The other medicine is for moderating looseness but
while that goes no farther than one or two looseness
Stools
in a morning I think it will ↑do↑ little harm and there¬
fore requires no medicine but whenever the looseness
is or threatens to be more considerable my prescription
may be employed by giving one or two table Spoonfulls
for a dose and repeating that dose two or three times
a day as may Seem to be necessary.


The pea Issue in the arm Should be continued and
in case of much breathlessness or cough a piece of blister
may be applied to the
breast with advantage.


I think bleeding Should not be repeated without
great necessity.

William Cullen

Edinburgh 31 October
1781



[Page 5]
For Mrs Hodgson

Take one scruple of Balsam of Tolu, two scruples of the best Myrrh, half a drachm of the purest White sugar, and three drachms of Licorice extract. Having broken the extract into little pieces, pour in enough boiling water to soften it and {illeg} let it be beaten into a pulp, to which add the other ingredients ground to a fine powder; and when enough boiling water has been added, let the mass be divided into pills of five grains each, gilt with gold. Label: Pectoral Pills two be taken every night at bedtime for a week or two together.

Take half a drachm each of pomegranate flowers and dried red Roses, one drachm of ground pomegranate bark, one ounce of Gum Arabic, and twelve ounces of boiling Water. Soak for four hours and then, having strained the mixture, add one ounce each of Tincture of Japanese earth and Diacodium syrup and eighty drops of Thebaic Tincture. Mix. Label: Strengthening Mixture a table Spoonfull or two to be taken for a dose when occasion requires

31 October 1781 -------
W.C.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
For Mrs Hodgson


Tho Mrs Hodgsons ailments have now Subsisted
very long and reduced her very much I am Still of opinion
that She is in no confirmed Consumption and hope that
by attention and care She may be greatly relieved and
preserved very long tho it may not be possible to restore
her to her former flesh and Strength.


Her first and great care must be ↑to↑ avoid cold and for
this purpose to be always warmly cloathed with flannel
or woollen every where next her Skin. She must also --
avoid all damp and moisture and any Stream of cold Air.
For the winter She may Sometimes in very mild weather
go abroad on horseback or in a carriage but Should never
walk out on foot and in cold frosty or even very wet weather
She Should keep very close at home.


She Should carefully avoid any the least bodily --
fatigue and therefore much walking or even Stirring much
within doors would be very bad for her but in very mild



[Page 2]

weather even in winter and more especially in the milder
seasons She will be much the better for going abroad either
on horseback behind a man or in a carriage.


In diet She will bear no Strong meat and Should not
not attempt to take it. At dinner She may Sometimes
take a bit of chicken, or rabbit, a bit of tripe or a Sweetbread
a little boiled veal or lamb or a little boiled whitefish as --
haddock, whiting or flounder but even of these She Should
take seldom and Sparingly. Her diet Should consist
chiefly of milk and grain as bread, rice, barley, Sago or
oatmeal and these prepared in any manner She likes best.
Instead of plain milk She may very often take buttermilk
but neither the buttermilk nor the milk that it is made
from Should be long kept and the best kind of buttermilk
is that which is made ↑immediately↑ from fresh Cows milk. Beside
Cows milk Mrs Hodgson if She can have it conveniently
may take Asses milk twice a day and when She either
takes this or warm Cows milk in the morning She may
Safely put a little rum or brandy into the milk.



[Page 3]

Besides grain Mrs Hodgson may take some other vegetables
Roots or greens but She must take care to avoid the colder
and more windy kinds. Potatoes is one of the Safest roots
and fruit of any kind that does not manifestly purge her
is otherwise very proper for her.


In drinking She must keep to water or watery li¬
quors as toast water, milk & water, water gruel or barley
water and all fermented or Spirituous liquors are
likely to do her harm and particularly malt liquor of
any kind.


By attending to these particulars of regimen I
hope Mrs Hodgson may have as much health and ease
as the present State of her constitution will admit of
and I think there are few medicines that can be of Ser¬
vice to her. I have only to propose two that may --
occasionally be usefull and I have prescribed them on a
paper apart.


One of them is a [box?] of pills which are intended
for removing obstructions in her breast and therefore



[Page 4]

when her breathing is a little more uneasy than usual let
her take two of these pills every night at bedtime for a
week or a fortnight.


The other medicine is for moderating looseness but
while that goes no farther than one or two looseness
Stools
in a morning I think it will ↑do↑ little harm and there¬
fore requires no medicine but whenever the looseness
is or threatens to be more considerable my prescription
may be employed by giving one or two table Spoonfulls
for a dose and repeating that dose two or three times
a day as may Seem to be necessary.


The pea Issue in the arm Should be continued and
in case of much breathlessness or cough a piece of blister
may be applied to the
breast with advantage.


I think bleeding Should not be repeated without
great necessity.

William Cullen

Edinr. 31 Octor.
1781



[Page 5]
For Mrs Hodgson


Balsam. Tolutan. ℈j
Myrrh. opt. ℈ij
Sacchar. alb. puriss. ʒſs
Extract. glycyrrhiz. puriss. ʒiij
Extracto in frustula minuta conciso affunde aquæ
ferventis q. s. ut mollescat et {illeg} contundatur in pulpam
cui adde cætera in pulverem tenuem trita et cum
aquæ ferventis q. s. fiat massa dividenda in pilulas
singulas granorum quinque deaurandas
Sig. Pectoral Pills two be taken every night at bedtime
for a week or two together.


balaustior.
rosar. rubr. Siccat. @ ʒſs
Cort. granator. contus. ʒj
Gum. Arabic. ℥j
Aquæ bullient. ℥xij Digere horas quatuor
et colato adde Tinct. terr. Iaponic. Syr. diacod. @ ℥j Tinct.
Thebaic.
guttas octoginta ℳ. Sig. Strengthening Mixture a
table Spoonfull or two to be taken for a dose when occasion requires

31 Octor. 1781 -------
W.C.

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