Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:2155] From: Dr Walter Stirling / To: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / Regarding: Miss Anne Gascoigne (Hamilton, Countess of Haddington or Lady Haddington (1786-96)) (Patient) / 20 February 1782 / (Incoming)

Letter from Walter Stirling, concerning the case of Miss Gascoigne. Her father has forwarded him Cullen's letter. Sterling emphasises that her cough is not the main problem, but her flying pains in her limbs, body and head. 'I figured her travelling in a wet Chaise might be the cause of them'.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 2155
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/2/1229
Main Language English
Document Direction Incoming
Date20 February 1782
Annotation None
TypeAuthorial original
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter from Walter Stirling, concerning the case of Miss Gascoigne. Her father has forwarded him Cullen's letter. Sterling emphasises that her cough is not the main problem, but her flying pains in her limbs, body and head. 'I figured her travelling in a wet Chaise might be the cause of them'.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:10]
Case of Miss Anne Gascoigne (Hamilton, later Countess of Haddington), who has chest and 'rheumatic' complaints.
5


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:2153]AuthorDr Walter Stirling
[PERS ID:1]AddresseeDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:2594]PatientMiss Anne Gascoigne (Hamilton, Countess of Haddington or Lady Haddington (1786-96))
[PERS ID:2153]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Walter Stirling
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:2595]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendMr Charles Gascoigne (Karl Gaskoin (in Russian))

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Stirling Mid Scotland Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Carron House Grangemouth Mid Scotland Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Dear Sir


Mr Gascoign sent me your letter
on Friday by post. I chanced to be from home, but received it yesterday
and went to Carron:House in the afternoon being sorry to think that
Miss Gascoigns Cough threatned any danger to her ––––


You are certainly right in thinking that a Cough in young persons
is not to be slighted, and that every precaution shoud early be taken
to prevent bad consequences from it, and therefor as to this you
have very properly given your advice, which will be carefully
attended to. But Miss Gascoign has other complaints that are
very distressing to her with flying pains and spasms through
her whole body. She woud certainly inform you of these and that
I figured her travelling in a wet Chaise might be the cause of them
Her distress did not begin like a Cold with cough, but first with
pain and stifness in the joints of her legs: then, flying pains att
times affected her forehead, her temples, her nose, sometimes one Eye
sometimes the other
her Cheeks her neck, shoulders joints of her arms
and legs and lastly her breast with difficulty in breathing but
never half a minute fixd in one place: It is since her breast became
affected that she has had Cough. Sometimes she has a pain which
suddenly goes from her breast to her back sometimes a spasm about the
region of the stomach
, which /as she expresses it/ draws ↑her↑ together as
with a Cord. I sat by her last night for four hours /she was at
her needlework/ and saw her affected in this manner – on most or all
the places I have named but had no cough till suppertime, after she
compleand of her breast. This morning I mett her comeing out of her
chamber coughing
: a dish of warm tea soon put it off. She told me that



[Page 2]

that she had no cough att going to bed, but before she sleepd was tormented
with Cramp in
both legs. She sleepd sound, but att breakfast and all
forenoon compleand of these flying pains. I askd her particularly /in
presence of her father/ about the spitting in the morning, she said that had
been greater eight days ago than now. I askd if then the Cough in
the morning
had been severe in bringing up that spitting. She answered
that att the time, she had that spitting she had no Cough it came away
by hawking. Her Cough does not come on till after she is out of
bed and she hawks up the spitting when she first awakens. Once in the
forenoon she compleand of that pain through her breast to her back but
lasted only a few seconds, for soon thereafter in telling a story she coud
and did talk and laugh aloud without pain, difficulty in breathing or cough
Be so good as reconsider her case and lett us hear your advice ––
how she is to gett free of these disagreeable and distressing complaints.
I am with great regard

Dear Sir
your most obedient humble
servant
Wal. Stirling
Stirling February 20th.
1782



[Page 3]


Doctor William Cullen Physician
Edinburgh


Dr W. Stirling
Concerning Miss Gascoigne
February 1782.
V. XIII p. 288

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Dear Sir


Mr Gascoign sent me your letter
on Friday by post. I chanced to be from home, but received it yesterday
and went to Carron:House in the afternoon being sorry to think that
Miss Gascoigns Cough threatned any danger to her ––––


You are certainly right in thinking that a Cough in young persons
is not to be slighted, and that every precaution shoud early be taken
to prevent bad consequences from it, and therefor as to this you
have very properly given your advice, which will be carefully
attended to. But Miss Gascoign has other complaints that are
very distressing to her wth flying pains and spasms through
her whole body. She woud certainly inform you of these and that
I figured her travelling in a wet Chaise might be the cause of them
Her distress did not begin like a Cold with cough, but first with
pain and stifness in the joints of her legs: then, flying pains att
times affected her forehead, her temples, her nose, sometimes one Eye
sometimes the other
her Cheeks her neck, shoulders joints of her arms
and legs and lastly her breast with difficulty in breathing but
never half a minute fixd in one place: It is since her breast became
affected that she has had Cough. Sometimes she has a pain which
suddenly goes from her breast to her back sometimes a spasm about the
region of the stomach
, which /as she expresses it/ draws ↑her↑ together as
with a Cord. I sat by her last night for four hours /she was at
her needlework/ and saw her affected in this manner – on most or all
the places I have named but had no cough till suppertime, after she
compleand of her breast. This morning I mett her comeing out of her
chamber coughing
: a dish of warm tea soon put it off. She told me that



[Page 2]

that she had no cough att going to bed, but before she sleepd was tormented
with Cramp in
both legs. She sleepd sound, but att breakfast and all
forenoon compleand of these flying pains. I askd her particularly /in
presence of her father/ about the spitting in the morning, she said that had
been greater eight days ago than now. I askd if then the Cough in
the morning
had been severe in bringing up that spitting. She answered
that att the time, she had that spitting she had no Cough it came away
by hawking. Her Cough does not come on till after she is out of
bed and she hawks up the spitting when she first awakens. Once in the
forenoon she compleand of that pain through her breast to her back but
lasted only a few seconds, for soon thereafter in telling a story she coud
and did talk and laugh aloud without pain, difficulty in breathing or cough
Be so good as reconsider her case and lett us hear your advice ––
how she is to gett free of these disagreeable and distressing complaints.
I am with great regard

Dr Sir
your most obedt. humble
servt.
Wal. Stirling
Stirlng Feby 20th.
1782



[Page 3]


Doctor William Cullen Physician
Edinr


Dr W. Stirling
C Miss Gascoigne
Febry 1782.
V. XIII p. 288

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