Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:209] From: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / To: Dr Joseph Borradaile / Regarding: Mr John Blair (Patient) / 27 October 1781 / (Outgoing)

Reply to Joseph Borradaile, concerning Mr. Blair's case, which Cullen still regards as hæmorrhoidal. He advises on medicines and exercise, and indicates that Borradaile is a former pupil.

Facsimile

There are 3 images for this document.

[Page 1]


 

[Page 2]


 

[Page 3]


 
 

Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 209
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/1/14/95
Main Language English
Document Direction Outgoing
Date27 October 1781
Annotation None
TypeMachine copy
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Reply to Joseph Borradaile, concerning Mr. Blair's case, which Cullen still regards as hæmorrhoidal. He advises on medicines and exercise, and indicates that Borradaile is a former pupil.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1280]
Case of John Blair who passes blood and believes his disorder stems from the umbilical region.
5


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:1]AuthorDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:180]AddresseeDr Joseph Borradaile
[PERS ID:2908]PatientMr John Blair
[PERS ID:180]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr Joseph Borradaile
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe inferred
Destination of Letter Wigton North-West England Europe inferred

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Dear Sir


I m favoured with yours of the 17th con¬
cerning Mr Blair but being carried to the country for some
days past could not answer you so soon as wished.


I have hitherto considered Mr Blairs Case as Hæm¬
orhoidal
and the pains of his right side as flatulent and no
uncommon symptom of Hæmorhoidal effects we do not find yet
any reason to change my opinion in these [matters?]. The pain
in the region of the stomach may be the effect of some disorder
in the {illeg}tions of the biliary system but that is not clearly evi¬
dent and I think it may with probability enough be referred to
a spasmodic affection of the stomach a common consequence of
{illeg}ily on the alimentary canal. It is my inclination and
I think it my duty to gentlemen who have formerly been my pu¬
pils thus to explain my opinion of cases in which they are [con¬
cerned?] with me. Upon this occasion I am glad to find Mr
Blair [in very good hands?] and to receive a very [sensible account?]
{illeg} on the subject of his disease {illeg}.




[Page 2]


the fundamental measure with Mr Blair is to avoid co¬
stiveness
and I know nothing so fit for that purpose as the
Oleum ricini
which you have employed and what answers best
with me is to put a fourth part of the Tinct. senn. comp. of the Edinburgh Pharmacopœia
to the oil and thus if to three ounces of oil you put one of Tinc¬
ture you will have a quantity in a vial which you may shake
very well together and when well shaken and mixed it is more
agreeable to most peoples palate and sits better on the stomach.
The dose must be adjusted by trial. I know a lady who by two tea
spoonfulls taken almost every at bedtime keeps herself quite easy
and regular. Possibly Mr Blair will require a larger dose but
the smaller the dose that will answer is the most proper. When
by any accident the proper measures have been neglected and
a costiveness comes on a glyster will give this most immediate
relief. It is possible that a blister applied to the part on the
right side
in which the pain usually comes may be of service
and there can be no harm in the trial but as I take the pain
to be occasional only and then depending on flatulence I doubt
if the relief by blistering will be permanent. I believe the



[Page 3]

relief to be expected must be from obviating costiveness, a mo¬
derate and cool manner of living and from some tonic medi¬
cines
for strengthening the alimentary canal. For this last
purpose I have found that Camomile flowers in Substance as an
excellent remedy. Let Mr Blair take half a dram or two scruples for a dose
two or three times a day as his Stomach & bowels bear it for it
sometimes proves laxative and if moderately so it is with a good effect.
it is not to ↑be↑ continued longer than a week or two at one time
but after some intermission another course of it may be
taken. If you have found any benefit from Asafœtida
or Aloes I will not oppose your continuing them but I
am strongly disposed to think them improper. If Mr Blair
could bear exercise on horseback I should expect benefit from it and
it is not necessary for that benefit to do more than walk the horse
but if he does not even bear that he should go in a carriage for
much walking would do harm and a little walking tho very proper
cannot do much good. Please make my compliments to Mr Blair
and believe me

Dear Sir your most obedient servant
William Cullen
[Edinburgh?] 27 October 1781

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Dear Sir


I m favoured with yours of the 17th con¬
cerning Mr Blair but being carried to the country for some
days past could not answer you so soon as wished.


I have hitherto considered Mr Blairs Case as Hæm¬
orhoidal
and the pains of his right side as flatulent and no
uncommon symptom of Hæmorhoidal effects we do not find yet
any reason to change my opinion in these [matters?]. The pain
in the region of the stomach may be the effect of some disorder
in the {illeg}tions of the biliary system but that is not clearly evi¬
dent and I think it may with probability enough be referred to
a spasmodic affection of the stomach a common consequence of
{illeg}ily on the alimentary canal. It is my inclination and
I think it my duty to gentlemen who have formerly been my pu¬
pils thus to explain my opinion of cases in which they are [con¬
cerned?] with me. Upon this occasion I am glad to find Mr
Blair [in very good hands?] and to receive a very [sensible account?]
{illeg} on the subject of his disease {illeg}.




[Page 2]


the fundamental measure with Mr Blair is to avoid co¬
stiveness
and I know nothing so fit for that purpose as the
Oleum ricini
which you have employed and what answers best
with me is to put a fourth part of the Tinct. senn. comp. Ph. Ed.
to the oil and thus if to three ounces of oil you put one of Tinc¬
ture you will have a quantity in a vial which you may shake
very well together and when well shaken and mixed it is more
agreeable to most peoples palate and sits better on the stomach.
The dose must be adjusted by trial. I know a lady who by two tea
spoonfulls taken almost every at bedtime keeps herself quite easy
and regular. Possibly Mr Blair will require a larger dose but
the smaller the dose that will answer is the most proper. When
by any accident the proper measures have been neglected and
a costiveness comes on a glyster will give this most immediate
relief. It is possible that a blister applied to the part on the
right side
in which the pain usually comes may be of service
and there can be no harm in the trial but as I take the pain
to be occasional only and then depending on flatulence I doubt
if the relief by blistering will be permanent. I believe the



[Page 3]

relief to be expected must be from obviating costiveness, a mo¬
derate and cool manner of living and from some tonic medi¬
cines
for strengthening the alimentary canal. For this last
purpose I have found that Camomile flowers in Substance as an
excellent remedy. Let Mr Blair take half a dram or ℈ij for a dose
two or three times a day as his Stomach & bowels bear it for it
sometimes proves laxative and if moderately so it is with a good effect.
it is not to ↑be↑ continued longer than a week or two at one time
but after some intermission another course of it may be
taken. If you have found any benefit from Asafœtida
or Aloes I will not oppose your continuing them but I
am strongly disposed to think them improper. If Mr Blair
could bear exercise on horseback I should expect benefit from it and
it is not necessary for that benefit to do more than walk the horse
but if he does not even bear that he should go in a carriage for
much walking would do harm and a little walking tho very proper
cannot do much good. Please make my compliments to Mr Blair
and believe me

Dear Sir your most obedient servant
William Cullen
[Edinr.?] 27 Octr. 1781

XML

XML file not yet available.

Feedback

Send us specfic feeback about this document [DOC ID:209]

Type
Comments
 

Please note that the Cullen Project team have now disbanded but your comments will be logged in our system and we will look at them one day...