Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:1840] From: Earl Dunbar Douglas (Hamilton) (Lord Selkirk, 4th Earl of Selkirk) / To: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / Regarding: Lord Basil William Douglas (Lord Daer) (Patient) / 12 April 1780 / (Incoming)

Letter from the Earl of Selkirk, concerning the case of his son, Lord Daer who is attending the Barbauld's school at Palgrave. He repeats much of his last letter fearing it may have been stolen in the post.

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

[Page 1]


 

[Page 2]


 

[Page 3]


 

[Page 4]


 
 

Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 1840
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/2/919
Main Language English
Document Direction Incoming
Date12 April 1780
Annotation None
TypeAuthorial original
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter from the Earl of Selkirk, concerning the case of his son, Lord Daer who is attending the Barbauld's school at Palgrave. He repeats much of his last letter fearing it may have been stolen in the post.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting Yes

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:364]
Case of Lord Daer (Basil Douglas), whose symptoms leave his family concerned that he may have consumption.
7


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:886]AuthorEarl Dunbar Douglas (Lord Selkirk, 4th Earl of Selkirk)
[PERS ID:1]AddresseeDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:885]PatientLord Basil William Douglas (Lord Daer)
[PERS ID:887]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Fordyce (Sir William Fordyce)
[PERS ID:1015]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr John Marissal
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1016]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendReverend Rochmont Barbauld
[PERS ID:886]Patient's Relative / Spouse / FriendEarl Dunbar Douglas (Lord Selkirk, 4th Earl of Selkirk)
[PERS ID:1014]OtherMrs Elliot (of Park St, Grosvenor Sq. London)
[PERS ID:1024]OtherMrs Susannah Marissal (Marisall)
[PERS ID:1025]OtherMiss Elliot

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Buroughbridge (Burrowbridge / Burrow Bridge) North-East England Europe certain
Destination of Letter Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Therapeutic Recommendation Bristol Wells Bristol South-West England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Scotland Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Carlisle North-West England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Cumberland North-West England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Diss East England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Dumfries Borders Scotland Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Hampstead London and South-East England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other London London and South-East England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Longtown North-West England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Norfolk East England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Norwich East England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Palgrave East England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Stilton East England Europe certain
Mentioned / Other Park St, Grosvenor's Sq. London London and South-East England Europe certain
Place of Handstamp Buroughbridge (Burrowbridge / Burrow Bridge) North-East England Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Burrow Bridge the 12 th of April 1780
Dear Sir


I beg leave to give you the trouble of this
from an anxiety lest a letter I wrote to you on
Monday night at Carlisle should not go safe. It was
not got to the Post Office till the man was on horse¬
back, it was given to him with strict charge to put it in
at Longtown, & to enforce his care, it was told him it
was for a Physician, & concerning health. These fellows
are sometimes forgetful of letters; & it is not impossible
as the letter was thick, he might think there were some
Scotch Notes in it, as it was about a consultation, in that
case the letter would run some risk. I therefore write
from this, as this is the first place that answers for ↑the↑ Edinburgh
Post, as it came across the country, and thought to have
got the post here this morning, but this is their Lay Day
answering to Sunday at London.


The letter I wrote was about my son Daers health, & had
inclosed a sheet of memorandums & excerpts from letters.
giving the particulars that had been wrote at different
times. I hope the letter has not miscarried, but lest it should
I shall write something in general, & hope you will
excuse it if unness unnecessary.


About the middle of January Daer caught a Cold (which he is
very liable to, & they often are tedious,) he had some cough
as usual, but they say the cough did not last long, but
he after some time had a light feverishness, not however
such as to confine him, nor interrupt his school business.
His cold & feverishness grew better, & worse, & at intervals
seemd quite gone, or nearly so, but often returned, or new
colds brought back the feverishness; once or twice he was
so ill as to lose his rest, & be obliged to keep his rooms I believe
a day, or part of a day. In february I wrote desiring, if he
was not soon well, to ↑write &↑ consult Dr Wm Fordyce at London, who
had about two years before attended him in a like complaint
when he had I think been confined partly to his bed, & partly to his room.



[Page 2]

Sometime ago he was bled, after having got Nitre & Magnesia for
about a fortnight, & also abstaining from animal food. He was
so much better that Fordyce was not wrote to till about ↑or after↑ the
middle of March, since that he has been again bled, about
the end of March, & on the 1st of April a letter was wrote that
he was much better; I have not had a letter of later date, except
one of the 4th from Dr Fordyce from London, who writes of
his having a good opinion of the care & sense &c of one mr
Marissal, a Surgeon who is at the place where Daer is; but
Fordyce I believe did not know him, but judged from the letters
mr Marissal wrote. He left it to his judgement whether
it was necessary to send for a Physician from Norwich, 20 Miles
off, or whether it was requsite or necessary for him viz. Fordyce
to see Daer. In the letter of the 1st I find mr Marissal
did not think it requisite to send for Dr Murray from Norwich.
I bid Dr Fordyce, if he thought exercise not improper for Daer,
write to them to send him to Hampstead ↑traveling moderately↑ where some of his
Brothers are at school, where he would be out of the bad air of
London, & yet he could see him easily: for it is 90 miles from
London where he is at present.


They write to me that they have got Asses Milk for him,
& if the weather was favourable he was to ride out.


I had determined to set out for seeing him, & only waited
one post for their account of what Dr Fordyce should write
in his second letter to them, & expecting one to myself from F–
on getting theirs of the 1st I set out & got Fordyces at Dum¬
fries. His letter I sent you extracts of, & I was before it
uneasy enough, & his letter tho I could not see from it any
thing of the present disorder being more immediately dange¬
rous than I had before had fears of, yet he speaks in very
strong terms of the danger he was in some years ago,
when I did not then apprehend he was in any.


I go now to do whatever shall be advised, & wish very
anxiously for your advice to me. I mean to take him
from school, & to keep by him, if or him with me this Sum–
mer. He was last winter to have come to Scotland to the
University, but I had imprudently brought him to Scotland the
year before, & keept him more than six months ↑there↑, at



[Page 3]

leaving one School, & before I could get intelligence of any
other I could think of putting him to: during his stay in
Scotland he lost his pronunciation of the English so much, that
I found it necessary he should be a year longer in England
than I had intended: lest before it was well fixed, he might
lose it too much at a Scotch University; If his health is
fit for it, I mean to have him with myself next winter
at Edinburgh. I have sent off two saddle horses, & mean if proper
to ride with him, with a postchaise in company, & to
jaunt about for sometime or if Bristol Wells is proper
to go there with him. Pray write to me what you
advise. He is naturally healthy but very apt to catch
Colds, & to be feverish with them, & to have them hang long
about him. He is however pretty strong & active; he is
growing pretty fast, & is enterd his Eighteenth year in
March last. It is a critical time of Life; none of
my connections were ever consumptive; but some
of Mrs Hamiltons Brothers ↑or near relations↑ I believe were so, &
died of it. Pray would your prescription to me,
for the feverishness that hung about me, be
proper or any thing of that kind; it did me great
service, it was Jamess Powders as an alterative,
to be taken twice morning & evening from one to three
grains: Exercise & great caution as to cold, till it could be
borne with moresafety.


When Daer is intirely free of this cold, cough & feverishness
& the weather proper, pray would not the Cold bath be good.
All that Summer he was last in Scotland he used it frequently,
yet he is still very apt to take cold: but where he is at present
they have no place for bathing, so he has had little of it
since. –– In the last letter I got, I observe they say though the cough
was returned with a fresh cold caught, yet there was not any pain
in the side; hence I fear there was a pain before, tho it had not
been mentioned. I am uneasy at the cold weather we have had ever
since the 1st of April till the 11th when it began to rain a little, & I
hope will now bring mild weather; but all the Cumberland Mountains
were covered with snow as I came along. Farewell Dear Sir

I am your most obedient humble Servant
Selkirk
To Dr Cullen



[Page 4]


Direct for me –– at Mrs Elliots in Park Street
Grosvenor Square London –
Miss Elliot who lives there with her Mother will
send it to me whether I be then in London or in
the Country. I go however directly to Suffolk unless
Daer be at Hampstead, which I will know tomorrow at
Stilton I expect by a letter. The School he is at is in Suffolk
but close by the border of Norfolk, a fine dry healthy situation
within a mile of Diss in Norfolk their post town. There is
another Diss in Suffolk, so it is necessary to (↑in↑) directing letters
to say Diss in Norfolk, the village is called Palgrave, &
the Schoolmasters name is Barbauld. In case you choose
to write to mr Marissal he lives in that village. I dont
know that he practices in that Country, but he is married
to mr Barbauld's Sister, & came there last summer on
account of health, from London where he practised. ––
Palgrave was the place where the Great Chancellor Bacon
was born, & the house is yet standing there.


a Single Sheet
To
Doctor Cullen
Edinburgh

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Burrow Bridge the 12 th of April 1780
Dear Sir


I beg leave to give you the trouble of this
from an anxiety lest a letter I wrote to you on
Monday night at Carlisle should not go safe. It was
not got to the Post Office till the man was on horse¬
back, it was given to him with strict charge to put it in
at Longtown, & to enforce his care, it was told him it
was for a Physician, & concerning health. These fellows
are sometimes forgetful of letters; & it is not impossible
as the letter was thick, he might think there were some
Scotch Notes in it, as it was about a consultation, in that
case the letter would run some risk. I therefore write
from this, as this is the first place that answers for ↑the↑ Edinr
Post, as it came across the country, and thought to have
got the post here this morning, but this is their Lay Day
answering to Sunday at London.


The letter I wrote was about my son Daers health, & had
inclosed a sheet of memorandums & excerpts from letters.
giving the particulars that had been wrote at different
times. I hope the letter has not miscarried, but lest it should
I shall write something in general, & hope you will
excuse it if unness unnecessary.


About the middle of Janry Daer caught a Cold (which he is
very liable to, & they often are tedious,) he had some cough
as usual, but they say the cough did not last long, but
he after some time had a light feverishness, not however
such as to confine him, nor interrupt his school business.
His cold & feverishness grew better, & worse, & at intervals
seemd quite gone, or nearly so, but often returned, or new
colds brought back the feverishness; once or twice he was
so ill as to lose his rest, & be obliged to keep his rooms I believe
a day, or part of a day. In february I wrote desiring, if he
was not soon well, to ↑write &↑ consult Dr Wm Fordyce at London, who
had about two years before attended him in a like complaint
when he had I think been confined partly to his bed, & partly to his room.



[Page 2]

Sometime ago he was bled, after having got Nitre & Magnesia for
about a fortnight, & also abstaining from animal food. He was
so much better that Fordyce was not wrote to till about ↑or after↑ the
middle of March, since that he has been again bled, about
the end of March, & on the 1st of April a letter was wrote that
he was much better; I have not had a letter of later date, except
one of the 4th from Dr Fordyce from London, who writes of
his having a good opinion of the care & sense &c of one mr
Marissal, a Surgeon who is at the place where Daer is; but
Fordyce I believe did not know him, but judged from the letters
mr Marissal wrote. He left it to his judgement whether
it was necessary to send for a Physician from Norwich, 20 Miles
off, or whether it was requsite or necessary for him viz. Fordyce
to see Daer. In the letter of the 1st I find mr Marissal
did not think it requisite to send for Dr Murray from Norwich.
I bid Dr Fordyce, if he thought exercise not improper for Daer,
write to them to send him to Hampstead ↑traveling moderately↑ where some of his
Brothers are at school, where he would be out of the bad air of
London, & yet he could see him easily: for it is 90 miles from
London where he is at present.


They write to me that they have got Asses Milk for him,
& if the weather was favourable he was to ride out.


I had determined to set out for seeing him, & only waited
one post for their account of what Dr Fordyce should write
in his second letter to them, & expecting one to myself from F–
on getting theirs of the 1st I set out & got Fordyces at Dum¬
fries. His letter I sent you extracts of, & I was before it
uneasy enough, & his letter tho I could not see from it any
thing of the present disorder being more immediately dange¬
rous than I had before had fears of, yet he speaks in very
strong terms of the danger he was in some years ago,
when I did not then apprehend he was in any.


I go now to do whatever shall be advised, & wish very
anxiously for your advice to me. I mean to take him
from school, & to keep by him, if or him with me this Sum–
mer. He was last winter to have come to Scotland to the
University, but I had imprudently brought him to Scotland the
year before, & keept him more than six months ↑there↑, at



[Page 3]

leaving one School, & before I could get intelligence of any
other I could think of putting him to: during his stay in
Scotland he lost his pronunciation of the English so much, that
I found it necessary he should be a year longer in England
than I had intended: lest before it was well fixed, he might
lose it too much at a Scotch University; If his health is
fit for it, I mean to have him with myself next winter
at Edinr. I have sent off two saddle horses, & mean if proper
to ride with him, with a postchaise in company, & to
jaunt about for sometime or if Bristol Wells is proper
to go there with him. Pray write to me what you
advise. He is naturally healthy but very apt to catch
Colds, & to be feverish with them, & to have them hang long
about him. He is however pretty strong & active; he is
growing pretty fast, & is enterd his Eighteenth year in
March last. It is a critical time of Life; none of
my connections were ever consumptive; but some
of Mrs Hamiltons Brothers ↑or near relations↑ I believe were so, &
died of it. Pray would your prescription to me,
for the feverishness that hung about me, be
proper or any thing of that kind; it did me great
service, it was Jamess Powders as an alterative,
to be taken twice morning & evening from one to three
grains: Exercise & great caution as to cold, till it could be
borne with moresafety.


When Daer is intirely free of this cold, cough & feverishness
& the weather proper, pray would not the Cold bath be good.
All that Summer he was last in Scotland he used it frequently,
yet he is still very apt to take cold: but where he is at present
they have no place for bathing, so he has had little of it
since. –– In the last letter I got, I observe they say though the cough
was returned with a fresh cold caught, yet there was not any pain
in the side; hence I fear there was a pain before, tho it had not
been mentioned. I am uneasy at the cold weather we have had ever
since the 1st of April till the 11th when it began to rain a little, & I
hope will now bring mild weather; but all the Cumberland Mountains
were covered with snow as I came along. Farewell Dear Sir

I am your most obedt humble Servt
Selkirk
To Dr Cullen



[Page 4]


Direct for me –– at Mrs Elliots in Park Street
Grosvenor Square London –
Miss Elliot who lives there with her Mother will
send it to me whether I be then in London or in
the Country. I go however directly to Suffolk unless
Daer be at Hampstead, which I will know tomorrow at
Stilton I expect by a letter. The School he is at is in Suffolk
but close by the border of Norfolk, a fine dry healthy situation
within a mile of Diss in Norfolk their post town. There is
another Diss in Suffolk, so it is necessary to (↑in↑) directing letters
to say Diss in Norfolk, the village is called Palgrave, &
the Schoolmasters name is Barbauld. In case you choose
to write to mr Marissal he lives in that village. I dont
know that he practices in that Country, but he is married
to mr Barbauld's Sister, & came there last summer on
account of health, from London where he practised. ––
Palgrave was the place where the Great Chancellor Bacon
was born, & the house is yet standing there.


a Single Sheet
To
Doctor Cullen
Edinburgh

XML

XML file not yet available.

Feedback

Send us specfic feeback about this document [DOC ID:1840]

Type
Comments
 

Please note that the Cullen Project team have now disbanded but your comments will be logged in our system and we will look at them one day...