Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:1809] From: Mr William Farquharson / To: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / Regarding: Mr McDuff (Patient), Miss Amelia Farquharson (of Invercauld) (Patient) / 27 January 1780 / (Incoming)

Letter from William Farquharson at Dunkeld concerning the case of Mr McDuff, who is to deliver the letter. He asks for Cullen's response in writing and explains the lengthy details he gives of the case due to the 'propensity [the patient] has of concealing his complaints, particularly from his Physician'. Letter also mentions the recent death of another shared patent, a Miss Farquharson.

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Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 1809
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/2/889
Main Language English
Document Direction Incoming
Date27 January 1780
Annotation None
TypeAuthorial original
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter from William Farquharson at Dunkeld concerning the case of Mr McDuff, who is to deliver the letter. He asks for Cullen's response in writing and explains the lengthy details he gives of the case due to the 'propensity [the patient] has of concealing his complaints, particularly from his Physician'. Letter also mentions the recent death of another shared patent, a Miss Farquharson.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:1117]
Case of Miss [Amelia] Farquharson of Invercauld who travels to Edinburgh to see Cullen but whose dangerously advanced consumption soon proves fatal.
4
[Case ID:2166]
Case of Mr McDuff who has a propensity for concealing his complaints.
2


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:663]AuthorMr William Farquharson
[PERS ID:1]AddresseeDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:664]PatientMr McDuff
[PERS ID:874]PatientMiss Amelia Farquharson (of Invercauld)
[PERS ID:663]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr William Farquharson
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:743]OtherMrs Anna Cullen

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Dunkeld Mid Scotland Scotland Europe certain
Destination of Letter Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Dunkeld January 27th 1780.


I beg leave to introduce to you the
bearer Mr Mcduff a patient of mine, whom I have ad¬
vised to consult you about a very troublesome com¬
plaint in his bowels which he has laboured under
for some time past - About 6 months ago he was
seized with a pain across the belly about the um¬
bilical region - which was attended with loss of
appetite
and an obstinate costiveness - it was
more than two months after it first came on be¬
fore I was acquainted of it and then in such
an imperfect manner that I did not know what
to make of it - however I prescribed some Ol. Ri¬
cini
which gave him some ease in the begin¬
ning but he gave it up before it could have
any great effect; and meeting with a friend of
his (a great pretender to Physic) he was advised
by him to take a large dose of Calomel & Rhubarb
and immediately after it above four ounces
of Glauber's Salts divided into 8 doses, which



[Page 2]

he took, one after another, as fast as he could swallow
them - this instead of removing the costiveness had
a contrary effect - so much that he was some -
times near a week without getting passage - in this
way he continued for several weeks without saying
any thing of the matter to me - at last he told
me - and I endeavoured to cleanse the guts of the
hardened scybala by emmolient clysters; and
supposing the disease to proceed from a relaxed
state of the intestinal canal, I ordered him a
small dose of Rhubarb & Sal Polychrest every
day about 12 oclock in a little chicken broth;
but this not suceeding according to my wish
I continued the clysters and changed the other
medicine to some Ol. Ricini given every
night at bed time with a dose of Laudanum
tho' this has relieved him a good deal he com¬
plains that the medicine sits heavy on
his stomach and sometimes cause him
to vomit –– I make no doubt this medicine
if properly persisted in would have removed
his complaints - but unluckily his temper is
too unsteady to persist long in any medicine
or


[Page 3]

regimen ––– he says he generally feels most pain
about mid day – and immediately after dinner
complains of his stomach and bowels being
much distended with Wind, which he passes
plentifully both upwards and downwards -
He was formerly a very hard drinker - but of
late he has given it up almost entirely ---


I have been much more particular than I
needed to have been - had I not known the
propensity he has of concealing his
compl[aint]s, particularly from his
Physician - upon this account I
am afraid you must take the trouble
of giving him his directions in writing -


I am very sorry to understand that our
patient poor Miss Farquharson has veri¬
fied our prognosis so soon - tho' indeed there
was no prospect of her ever getting the better
of her complaints - had she lived even some
months longer ---- I beg best compliments
to Mrs Cullen - and am with the greatest
respect


Dear Sir
your most Obedient Servant
Wm. Farquharson



[Page 4]


Dr. William Cullen
Physician
Edinburgh


Mr Farquharson
Concerning Mr Macduff
January 1700
V.X. p. 161

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Dunkeld Jany. 27th 1780.


I beg leave to introduce to you the
bearer Mr Mcduff a patient of mine, whom I have ad¬
vised to consult you about a very troublesome com¬
plaint in his bowels which he has laboured under
for some time past - About 6 months ago he was
seized with a pain across the belly about the um¬
bilical region - which was attended with loss of
appetite
and an obstinate costiveness - it was
more than two months after it first came on be¬
fore I was acquainted of it and then in such
an imperfect manner that I did not know what
to make of it - however I prescribed some Ol. Ri¬
cini
which gave him some ease in the begin¬
ning but he gave it up before it could have
any great effect; and meeting with a friend of
his (a great pretender to Physic) he was advised
by him to take a large dose of Calomel & Rhubarb
and immediately after it above four ounces
of Glauber's Salts divided into 8 doses, which



[Page 2]

he took, one after another, as fast as he could swallow
them - this instead of removing the costiveness had
a contrary effect - so much that he was some -
times near a week without getting passage - in this
way he continued for several weeks without saying
any thing of the matter to me - at last he told
me - and I endeavoured to cleanse the guts of the
hardened scybala by emmolient clysters; and
supposing the disease to proceed from a relaxed
state of the intestinal canal, I ordered him a
small dose of Rhubarb & Sal Polychrest every
day about 12 oclock in a little chicken broth;
but this not suceeding according to my wish
I continued the clysters and changed the other
medicine to some Ol. Ricini given every
night at bed time with a dose of Laudanum
tho' this has relieved him a good deal he com¬
plains that the medicine sits heavy on
his stomach and sometimes cause him
to vomit –– I make no doubt this medicine
if properly persisted in would have removed
his complaints - but unluckily his temper is
too unsteady to persist long in any medicine
or


[Page 3]

regimen ––– he says he generally feels most pain
about mid day – and immediately after dinner
complains of his stomach and bowels being
much distended with Wind, which he passes
plentifully both upwards and downwards -
He was formerly a very hard drinker - but of
late he has given it up almost entirely ---


I have been much more particular than I
needed to have been - had I not known the
propensity he has of concealing his
compl[aint]s, particularly from his
Physician - upon this account I
am afraid you must take the trouble
of giving him his directions in writing -


I am very sorry to understand that our
patient poor Miss Farquharson has veri¬
fied our prognosis so soon - tho' indeed there
was no prospect of her ever getting the better
of her complaints - had she lived even some
months longer ---- I beg best compliments
to Mrs Cullen - and am with the greatest
respect


Dear Sir
your most Obdt. Sert.
Wm. Farquharson



[Page 4]


Dr. William Cullen
Physician
Edinburgh


Mr Farquharson
C Mr Macduff
Janry. 1700
V.X. p. 161

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