Cullen

The Consultation Letters of Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

 

[ID:1252] From: Mr James Owen Merry / To: Dr William Cullen (Professor Cullen) / Regarding: Archibald Buchanan (Archy) (Patient) / 12 March 1776 / (Incoming)

Letter from James Owen Merry, regarding the case of Mr Buchanan. He states that 'every approved Idea, in my opinion and advices to Mr. Buchanan, were all your own', and discusses reading Cullen's lectures and visiting him in person. He also mentions a perceived increase in 'disorders of the Breast' and its possible causes, including smallpox inoculations.

Facsimile

There are 4 images for this document.

[Page 1]


 

[Page 2]


 

[Page 3]


 

[Page 4]


 
 

Metadata

FieldData
DOC ID 1252
RCPE Catalogue Number CUL/1/2/352
Main Language English
Document Direction Incoming
Date12 March 1776
Annotation None
TypeAuthorial original
Enclosure(s) No enclosure(s)
Autopsy No
Recipe No
Regimen No
Letter of Introduction No
Case Note No
Summary Letter from James Owen Merry, regarding the case of Mr Buchanan. He states that 'every approved Idea, in my opinion and advices to Mr. Buchanan, were all your own', and discusses reading Cullen's lectures and visiting him in person. He also mentions a perceived increase in 'disorders of the Breast' and its possible causes, including smallpox inoculations.
Manuscript Incomplete? No
Evidence of Commercial Posting No

Case

Cases that this document belongs to:

Case ID Description Num Docs
[Case ID:361]
Case of Mr [Archibald?] Buchanan who calls on Cullen over his chest pains and cough.
3


People linked to this document

Person IDRole in documentPerson
[PERS ID:574]AuthorMr James Owen Merry
[PERS ID:1]AddresseeDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)
[PERS ID:1664]Patient Archibald Buchanan (Archy)
[PERS ID:574]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryMr James Owen Merry
[PERS ID:1]Patient's Physician / Surgeon / ApothecaryDr William Cullen (Professor Cullen)

Places linked to this document

Role in document Specific Place Settlements / Areas Region Country Global Region Confidence
Place of Writing Parliament Square Edinburgh Edinburgh and East Scotland Europe certain

Normalized Text

[Page 1]
Sir


The honourable mention you have
been pleased to make of me in your advice to M.r Buchanan
affects me in the most delicate manner. I do not know
whether I ought to be silent upon the occasion, or not.
I feel my pride exalted; nor do I feel the confession I am
forced in justice to make, can, take from it in the least:
= on the contrary it must surely add to it.


I therefore beg leave to declare
that every approved Idea, in my opinions and advices
to M.r Buchanan, were all your own: -- I had read
you Sir, long before I saw you - and it was to hear
you Sir - that induced me to take a voyage, even
from the South; for, if perusing your Lectures (though
with all the inaccuracies that unavoidably must attend
the nicest observer who takes notes, and which were sent
to me abroad) coud charm me, what satisfaction might
I not expect by attending the Professor in person?


I wished



[Page 2]

indeed to have done so this Season, but deferred it
until the next in pursuance of your advice.


Not a few of your opinions have
also gone through my hands, from time to time, in differ¬
ent parts of the world; many of them, on Consumptive
cases
, I might indeed have said most of them.


As I cou'd not behold the amazing
number if my Countrymen flying abroad for health
without some reflection; I found upon enquiring that their
number encreased every year, keeping pace indeed
with our Register of diseases at home, from whence it
seems to me that disorders of the Breast have really
become Endemial with the inhabitants of Great Britain
and Ireland. To trace the primary cause is reser¬
ved for such a pen as yours - and as consequences
are deduced from premises, the proximate causes come
in course to be considerd.


That complaints of this kind are
allowed to be Hereditary - is not I believe denied by
any - but that they are always so, none I imagine will
be hardy enough to affirm: - daily may we see young
people dying consumptive - whilst the Parents live



[Page 3]

to great age enjoying health.


Having paid more than ordinary
attention to Consumptive patients - I found very many
of them dating their complaints, from slight cold caught
by wetting their feet, - drinking cold liquor when the
body was heated, - cough not attended to; - but I found
a still greater number - where I suspected the cause to
arise from too early and excessive venery, and a too free
use of Wine & Strong Liquors; - which may in some mea¬
sure account why Men are more obnoxious to these
complaints than Women.


There is only one other observation
I have now to make - which is - that 9 out of 14 who came
under my notice within there 2 years past, I found
they had been Inoculated for the Small pox


As it is facts alone that I have now
humbly submitted, I shall not here presume to draw
any conclusions; I will nevertheless continue my enqui¬
ries at every opportunity: and, it is on your known
candour and goodness that I now throw myself, in
hopes of pardon for this present intrusion.


Be assured, that I shall ever



[Page 4]

remain with due deferrence


Sir
Your Highly Obliged
and very humble Servant
James Owen Merry

Parliament square
12th March 1776


For
William Cullen MD.

Diplomatic Text

[Page 1]
Sir


The honourable mention you have
been pleased to make of me in your advice to M.r Buchanan
affects me in the most delicate manner. I do not know
whether I ought to be silent upon the occasion, or not.
I feel my pride exalted; nor do I feel the confession I am
forced in justice to make, can, take from it in the least:
= on the contrary it must surely add to it.


I therefore beg leave to declare
that every approved Idea, in my opinions and advices
to M.r Buchanan, were all your own: -- I had read
you Sir, long before I saw you - and it was to hear
you Sir - that induced me to take a voyage, even
from the South; for, if perusing your Lectures (though
with all the inaccuracies that unavoidably must attend
the nicest observer who takes notes, and which were sent
to me abroad) coud charm me, what satisfaction might
I not expect by attending the Professor in person?


I wished



[Page 2]

indeed to have done so this Season, but deferred it
until the next in pursuance of your advice.


Not a few of your opinions have
also gone through my hands, from time to time, in differ¬
ent parts of the world; many of them, on Consumptive
cases
, I might indeed have said most of them.


As I cou'd not behold the amazing
number if my Countrymen flying abroad for health
without some reflection; I found upon enquiring that their
number encreased every year, keeping pace indeed
with our Register of diseases at home, from whence it
seems to me that disorders of the Breast have really
become Endemial with the inhabitants of Great Britain
and Ireland. To trace the primary cause is reser¬
ved for such a pen as yours - and as consequences
are deduced from premises, the proximate causes come
in course to be considerd.


That complaints of this kind are
allowed to be Hereditary - is not I believe denied by
any - but that they are always so, none I imagine will
be hardy enough to affirm: - daily may we see young
people dying consumptive - whilst the Parents live



[Page 3]

to great age enjoying health.


Having paid more than ordinary
attention to Consumptive patients - I found very many
of them dating their complaints, from slight cold caught
by wetting their feet, - drinking cold liquor when the
body was heated, - cough not attended to; - but I found
a still greater number - where I suspected the cause to
arise from too early and excessive venery, and a too free
use of Wine & Strong Liquors; - which may in some mea¬
sure account why Men are more obnoxious to these
complaints than Women.


There is only one other observation
I have now to make - which is - that 9 out of 14 who came
under my notice within there 2 years past, I found
they had been Inoculated for the Small pox


As it is facts alone that I have now
humbly submitted, I shall not here presume to draw
any conclusions; I will nevertheless continue my enqui¬
ries at every opportunity: and, it is on your known
candour and goodness that I now throw myself, in
hopes of pardon for this present intrusion.


Be assured, that I shall ever



[Page 4]

remain with due deferrence


Sir
Your Highly Obliged
and very humble Servant
James Owen Merry

Parliament square
12th March 1776


For
William Cullen MD.

XML

XML file not yet available.

Feedback

Send us specfic feeback about this document [DOC ID:1252]

Type
Comments
 

Please note that the Cullen Project team have now disbanded but your comments will be logged in our system and we will look at them one day...